2018 SHL Division Playoff – Game 3

Western Division Series

ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 5, MICHIGAN GRAY WOLVES 1

Even though the Anchorage Igloos won the first two games of their best-of-five series against the Michigan Gray Wolves on the road and were all but certain to advance to the SHL Finals, C Jake Frost had one message for his teammates before today’s Game 3.  “I want us to go out and take care of business tonight,” Frost said.  “There’s a damn good team over in the other locker room, and we shouldn’t give them a chance to get back in it.  Let’s end it now.”

End it the Igloos did, and in blowout fashion.  They shelled Wolves goalie Dirk Lundquist – Frost, who scored twice, led the way – and came away with a 5-1 win, completing a stunning sweep that few would have predicted before the series began.

“They were geared up for a fight, and we weren’t,” said Michigan RW Oskar Denison.  “They ran us right off the ice.”

Throughout the series, Anchorage thrived by playing at a faster pace than Michigan could handle.
In Game 3, the Wolves were determined to prevent the first-period ambush that they’d suffered in the first two contests.  They succeeded in limiting the Igloos to 12 shots in the period, and emerged with a scoreless tie – the first time all series that they didn’t trail after the opening stanza.

“We hadn’t let them tilt the ice on us,” Wolves C Warren Marlow said of the first period.  “But we knew we needed to go out and score a couple, and seize the momentum.”

Unfortunately for Michigan, the Igloos quickly turned the tide in their favor in the second period.  About three minutes in, LW Les Collins won the race for a loose puck at center ice, and he and RW Remi Montrechere sped up the ice on a breakaway.  Montrechere finished the rush with a beautiful shot in the upper right corner of the net to make it 1-0.

“That goal was huge,” said Igloos coach Sam Castor.  “It lit up the crowd, lit up our bench, got everybody going.”

A few minutes later, the Anchorage third line – which tormented the Wolves all series – struck again.  They set up an extended shift in the offensive zone and ran Michigan ragged.  After almost two full minutes of zone time, LW Waldo Miranda buried a slapper for a two-goal lead.

The frustrated Wolves took a couple penalties in quick succession.  They killed off the ensuing 5-on-3 situation, but struggled to get the puck out of their own end.  Finally, Frost fired a bullet that deflected off of Lundquist’s glove and into the net, giving Anchorage a 3-0 advantage.  The fans at Arctic Circle Arena began serenading Lundquist’s name as a sing-song taunt.

“You could just see [the Wolves’] heads sagging on the bench after that,” said Frost.  “I think we broke them right there.”

It was bad enough that Michigan coach Ron Wright considered pulling his elite netminder.  “I wanted to spare him,” said the coach.  “But I knew that yanking him would basically be waving the white flag, and I wasn’t going to do that.”

Lundquist stayed in the game, and three minutes into the third, Frost beat him again on a deflection that went under his blocker.

“I failed my teammates, in this game and in this series,” said the Wolves goaltender.  “My team needed me to be at my best, and I wasn’t.”

The Wolves finally played with speed and desperation after that, but it was far too late.  RW Benoit Poulin finally broke the shutout midway through the third, pushing the puck over the goal line after a scrum in front of the crease.  But Igloos RW Nicklas Ericsson struck back on the power play a minute and a half later to restore Anchorage’s four-goal edge.

During the postgame celebration, the Igloos seemed a bit shocked at their conquest.  “We told ourselves all along that we matched up great with [the Wolves],” said D Sebastian Pomfret.  “But we weren’t expecting it to be… this easy.”

Castor lauded his team for a heroic effort.  “I told my boys that if we were going to win this, we’d have to give them hell,” Castor told reporters.  “And we did just that.  We gave them hell for three straight games.  I couldn’t be prouder.”

He did note that the Igloos would be moving on to the the Finals without Montechere, who exited in the third period with an upper-body injury and is expected to miss the rest of the season.  “Now we’ve got to go win the Vandy for Remi,” Castor said.

Wright, meanwhile, was somber as he contemplated his team’s loss.  “Congratulations to Anchorage for playing a terrific series,” the Michigan coach said.  “They really took it to us.  We failed in every aspect of the game, and I take responsibility for that.  We seemed to think we were bulletproof because we had a good regular season.  Well, now we’ll have all offseason to think about how we came up short, and how we can come back stronger next year.”

W Final - Game 3, Michigan @ Anchorage, Arctic Circle Arena

                   1   2   3   OT   F
Michigan           0   0   1        1
Anchorage          0   3   2        5

 
Michigan               G   A PTS PIM +/-   Anchorage              G   A PTS PIM +/-

Douglas         LW     0   0   0   0  -1   Koons           LW     0   2   2   4   1
Kronstein       D      0   0   0   2  -3   Keefe           D      0   2   2   2   3
Madison         D      0   0   0   0  -3   Frost           C      2   0   2   0   1
Lunsford        RW     0   0   0   0  -1   Martinsson      D      0   1   1   0   0
Beruschko       LW     0   0   0   2  -1   Ericsson        RW     1   2   3   0   1
Mudrick         D      0   1   1   2   0   Collins         LW     0   1   1   2   1
Marlow          C      0   1   1   0  -1   Pomfret         D      0   1   1   0   3
Zabielski       D      0   0   0   2   0   Bernard         C      0   0   0   4   1
Poulin          RW     1   0   1   0  -1   Frederick       D      0   0   0   2   0
Davenport       LW     0   0   0   0  -1   Montrechere     RW     1   0   1   0   1
Bergdorf        D      0   0   0   0   0   Miranda         LW     1   0   1   0   1
Knight          C      0   0   0   0  -1   Citrone         D      0   0   0   0   0
Tollefson       D      0   0   0   2   0   Calligan        D      0   0   0   2   0
Denison         RW     0   0   0   2  -1   Summers         RW     0   0   0   0   1
Cage            C      0   0   0   0  -1   Bellmore        C      0   1   1   0   1
----------------------------------------   ----------------------------------------
TOTALS                 1   2   3  12  -3   TOTALS                 5  10  15  16   3

Scratches:
MIC:  Bailes (inj), Berlinger, Bullock, Eberlein
ANC:  Zhlotkin, Druzek, Trammell

 
Michigan            SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Lundquist           38    33    5  0.868

Anchorage           SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Worthington         32    31    1  0.969

 

First Period
------------

GOALS:
None


PENALTIES:
03:33  MIC  Mudrick 2:00 (Elbowing)
04:51  ANC  Koons 4:00 (Elbowing)
15:03  ANC  Bernard 4:00 (Unsportsmanlike Conduct)
16:45  ANC  Collins 2:00 (Slashing)
17:55  MIC  Denison 2:00 (Interference)

Second Period
-------------

GOALS:
02:51  ANC  Montrechere (Collins, Keefe)
07:09  ANC  Miranda (Bellmore, Martinsson)
11:00  ANC  Frost (Ericsson, Koons)

PENALTIES:
03:22  ANC  Keefe 2:00 (Hooking)
07:43  MIC  Tollefson 2:00 (Cross-checking)
07:54  MIC  Kronstein 2:00 (Interference)
13:56  ANC  Calligan 2:00 (Roughing)
16:02  ANC  Frederick 2:00 (Cross-checking)

Third Period
------------

GOALS:
03:06  ANC  Frost (Koons, Ericsson)
11:05  MIC  Poulin (Marlow, Mudrick)
12:30  ANC  Ericsson PP (Keefe, Pomfret)

PENALTIES:
07:09  MIC  Zabielski 2:00 (Slashing)
12:10  MIC  Beruschko 2:00 (Elbowing)


 
SHOTS
------
                   1   2   3   OT   F
Michigan           9   8  15       32
Anchorage         12  12  14       38

 
POWER PLAYS
-----------

Michigan         0 for 6
Anchorage        1 for 6

 
INJURIES
--------

Remi Montrechere (ANC) -- Upper-body  10 games
Max Madison (MIC) -- Lower-body  7 games

 

Eastern Division Series

HAMILTON PISTOLS 4, QUEBEC TIGRES 3 (DOUBLE OT)

The Hamilton Pistols certainly didn’t make things easy on themselves in a must-win Game 3.  They had to rally from behind twice, and then required more than a period and a half of extra time.  But when the end finally came after a long hard slog, the Pistols notched a 4-3 victory over the Quebec Tigres, staving off elimination in their series.

“You’ve got to give the boys credit,” said Hamilton coach Keith Shields.  “They got knocked to the canvas a couple times, but they got up and kept battling, by golly!”

The Tigres knocked the Pistols back on their heels early.  Hamilton D Albie Glasco took a tripping penalty 17 seconds into the game, and Quebec RW Rupert MacDiarmid made them pay with a blast from the top of the faceoff circle.  Even though the Pistols outshot the Tigres 13-9 in the first, they couldn’t pierce Tiktuunen.

“It seemed like that guy was eight feet tall out there,” said Pistols C Calvin Frye.  “We tried everything we could to get it by him, and he just shut us down.”

That finally changed in a crazy stretch at the beginning of the second period.  After Pistols D Craig Werner was sent off for slashing, MacDiarmid banged home another power-play goal to make it 2-0.  The lightly-regarded MacDiarmid has tormented Hamilton in this series, with three goals and an assist so far.

No sooner had Quebec built a two-goal edge than it vanished in a puff of smoke.  Pistols LW Steven Alexander went top-shelf on Tiktuunen 53 seconds after MacDiarmid’s tally to end the shutout.  Seconds later, Tigres LW Walt Camernitz was whistled for slashing, and Alexander beat Tiktuunen on the short side to tie the game.

The second period slowed down after that, although Camernitz added another power play tally with six minutes left in the period to put Quebec back on top.

“Even though we were behind going into the third, we felt confident,” said Alexander.  “We’d proven that Tiktuunen was human.”

The crowd at Gunpowder Armory was full-throated in support of their heroes, rattling the rafters with their cheers.  The Pistols opened the period on the power play and four seconds into the frame, Tigres D Dmitri Kalashnikov was sent off for interference, giving Hamilton a two-man advantage.  Frye wasted no time putting the puck between Tiktuunen’s legs to tie it up again.

“I honestly thought the building was going to come down, the fans went so crazy,” said Frye.

The rest of the period was a tense but scoreless affair.  The Pistols killed off a couple of late penalties to preserve the tie, and the fans roared their approval.

In overtime, Hamilton relied on the crowd’s raucous support to give them energy.  Camernitz nearly ended the game – and Hamilton’s season – three minutes in, when he fired a shot from the slot that got past Pistols netminder Lasse Koskinen.  But the shot pinged off the post and came to rest in the crease, when Koskinen covered it before the Tigres could poke it in.

“The way that shot somehow didn’t get over the line, that was an act of God,” said Shields.  “No other way around it.”

The game went to a second overtime, and the pace of the game slowed considerably, as both teams looked dead on their skates.  But again, the crowd’s energy fed the Pistols.  “The fans really picked us up there,” said Alexander.  “We couldn’t have done this without them.”

When Tigres D Laurie Workman was called for slashing twelve minutes into the second overtime, the fans somehow cranked the fury up to another level.  Amid the maelstrom, Pistols LW Magnus Gunnarson fired a shot that made it through a crowd and past a screened Tiktuunen for the game-winning goal.

Workman’s penalty was one of 10 called on the Tigres in the game, and coach Martin Delorme cautioned his team that they need to improve in this area.  “When we take this many penalties, we are doing [the Pistols’] work for them,” Delorme said.

Shields, meanwhile, wants the fans to bring the same enthusiasm for Game 4.  “I want to say to our fans, you guys did a great job tonight,” the Pistols coach said.  “I want you all to go home, rest up, and come back strong for the next one.  We need that kind of energy in the building again.”

E Final - Game 3, Quebec @ Hamilton, Gunpowder Armory

                   1   2   3  1OT 2OT   F
Quebec             1   2   0    0   0   3
Hamilton           0   2   1    0   1   4

Quebec                 G   A PTS PIM +/-   Hamilton               G   A PTS PIM +/-

Camernitz       LW     1   0   1   4  -1   Alexander       LW     2   0   2   0   1
Workman         D      0   0   0   2   0   Smyth           D      0   1   1   2   0
Zarkovich       C      0   0   0   0   0   Frye            C      1   0   1   0   1
McKinley        D      0   0   0   0   0   Risch           D      0   2   2   0   0
Mirac           RW     0   1   1   2  -1   Lafayette       RW     0   2   2   0   1
Fisker          LW     0   1   1   0   0   Gunnarson       LW     1   0   1   0   0
Ilyushin        C      0   1   1   0  -1   Mulligan        D      0   0   0   4   0
Jones           D      0   1   1   0   0   Constantine     C      0   1   1   0   0
Robinson        RW     0   0   0   0   0   Werner          D      0   0   0   4   0
MacDiarmid      LW     2   0   2   2   0   Patterson       RW     0   1   1   0   0
Pugliese        D      0   0   0   0  -1   Campbell        LW     0   0   0   0   0
Kalashnikov     D      0   0   0   6  -1   Glasco          D      0   0   0   2   1
Pentti          RW     0   0   0   0   0   Zalmanis        C      0   0   0   0   0
Miller          C      0   1   1   2   0   Soforenko       LW     0   0   0   0   0
Wesson          D      0   0   0   2   0   Dyomin          D      0   1   1   0   1
----------------------------------------   ----------------------------------------
TOTALS                 3   5   8  20  -1   TOTALS                 4   8  12  12   1

Scratches:
QUE:  Shovshenkov, Zhzhynov, Kane
HAM:  Kratz, Jennings, Rodney

Quebec              SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Tiktuunen           41    37    4  0.902

Hamilton            SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Koskinen            41    38    3  0.927


First Period
------------

GOALS:
00:27  QUE  MacDiarmid PP (Fisker)

PENALTIES:
00:17  HAM  Glasco 2:00 (Tripping)
07:34  QUE  Kalashnikov 2:00 (Tripping)
07:45  QUE  Mirac 2:00 (Interference)
17:25  QUE  Kalashnikov 2:00 (Cross-checking)
18:27  HAM  Mulligan 2:00 (Hooking)

Second Period
-------------

GOALS:
00:56  QUE  MacDiarmid PP (Jones, Miller)
01:49  HAM  Alexander (Dyomin, Lafayette)
02:54  HAM  Alexander PP (Smyth, Risch)
14:06  QUE  Camernitz PP (Ilyushin, Mirac)

PENALTIES:
00:29  HAM  Werner 2:00 (Slashing)
02:10  QUE  Camernitz 2:00 (Slashing)
06:06  QUE  MacDiarmid 2:00 (Roughing)
09:28  QUE  Miller 2:00 (Elbowing)
14:04  HAM  Werner 2:00 (Clipping)
18:53  QUE  Wesson 2:00 (Tripping)

Third Period
------------

GOALS:
00:10  HAM  Frye PP (Lafayette, Risch)

PENALTIES:
00:04  QUE  Kalashnikov 2:00 (Interference)
11:04  HAM  Smyth 2:00 (Slashing)
19:09  HAM  Mulligan 2:00 (Tripping)

First Overtime
--------------

GOALS:
None

PENALTIES:
10:14  QUE  Camernitz 2:00 (Interference)

First Overtime
--------------

GOALS:
12:49  HAM  Gunnarson PP (Constantine, Patterson)

PENALTIES:
12:00  QUE  Workman 2:00 (Slashing)

SHOTS
------
                   1   2   3  1OT  2OT   F
Quebec             9   9   9   10    4  41
Hamilton          13   8   8    8    4  41

POWER PLAYS
-----------

Quebec           3 for 6
Hamilton         3 for 10

INJURIES
--------

None

 

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Igloos Prevail Over KC In Wild OT Battle

When the Anchorage Igloos hosted the Kansas City Smoke on Friday, they were hoping for an easy win over a team on an eight-game winless streak, which would allow them to solidify their second-place standing in the West.  While the Igloos did ultimately prevail over the Smoke, it was anything but easy.  Twice, Anchorage had to rally from three-goal deficits, and needed overtime before they escaped with a wild 8-7 victory.

“Man, that was a battle we weren’t expecting!” exclaimed C Jake Frost after the game.  “We showed a lot of fight, a lot of heart, but boy, KC put a scare into us.”

The Smoke showed up ready to play.  It only took 15 seconds for LW Louis LaPlante to get on the board with his first goal of the season, a slapper past Igloos netminder Wendall Cantillon. Frost evened things up two minutes later with a shot from the right faceoff circle, but rookie C Noel Picard put the Smoke back ahead just over a minute later with a tip-in from the slot.  Midway through the first, Kansas City struck twice to take a 4-1 lead, leaving the crowd at Arctic Circle Arena in an uneasy silence.

Igloos coach Sam Castor considered lifting Cantillon at that point.  But given that it was the backup’s first action all week, the coach stayed with his goalie.  “Wendall’s got to have a chance to deal with adversity,” said Castor.  “I wanted to see how he’d react, and how the team would react.”

Anchorage rallied to Cantillon’s rescue, with RW Remi Montrechere and D “Chilly Willy” Calligan scoring to pull within one by the end of the period.  Four minutes into the second period, Montrechere struck again to tie it up and bring the crowd to its feet.

“We felt like the mommentum was going our way,” said Montrechere.  “We were in control and ready to pull away.”

As it turned out, the momentum was about to shift back to the visitors.  Three minutes after Montechere’s tally, Smoke LW Piotr Soforenko deflected a shot past Cantillon to retake the lead.  C Phil Miller went top-shelf to make it a 6-4 game at the end of the second period.

47 seconds into the third period, Kansas City D Tony Hunt notched a power-play tally to give the Smoke another three-goal lead and putting the Igloos behind the eight ball.

“We needed a jolt, and fast,” said Frost.

They got a pair of jolts in short order.  Five seconds after Hunt’s score, Montrechere blasted a shot just inside the pole to complete his hat trick.  Then, a minute later, C Broni Zhlotkin took exception to a rough hit from Hunt and dropped the gloved with him at center ice.  Although the donnybrook completed Hunt’s “Gordie Howe hat trick” (a goal, an assist, and a fight), it fired up both the Anchorage bench and the crowd.

Twenty seconds after the fight, LW Les Collins banged home a juicy rebound to pull the Igloos within one.  Six and a half minutes later, C Nile Bernard went five-hole on KC goaltender Brooks Copeland and tied it up.  Bernard jumped up against the boards in the corner as the fans banged the glass in delight.

Although the atmosphere in the arena remained near delirium for most of the third period, the Igloos couldn’t push the go-ahead goal across.  Frost and Collins each hit the post, and Copeland made a tremendous sprawling stop with three minutes left in regulation to rob Montrechere of a fourth goal.

The game went to overtime, with both teams and the fans exhausted.  “In OT, that was all adrenaline,” said Frost.  “We had no energy left.”  With a minute and a half left in the extra session, RW Nicklas Ericsson faked a pass to Frost in the slot and slid it up to the blue line, where D Ted Keefe fired a blast that hit the crossbar and went in for the game-winning goal.

Keefe’s goal delivered the Igloos their fourth straight win and their fifth in the last six games.  It also moved Anchorage seven points clear of Saskatchewan and Seattle for second place; it’s their largest lead of the season.  But Castor remains dissatisfied with his team’s performance.  “We had no business winning this game,” the coach said.  “We’ve looked a lot better this week, but we’re going to need to tighten it up on a night-to-night basis if we’re going to make the playoffs.”

Castor’s players were happier with the outcome. “Coming back from a three-goal [deficit] in a game is a game is impressive,” said Frost.  “Doing it twice in one game?  That doesn’t happen.  We’re pretty awesome!”

2017 SHL Finals – Game 1

ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 5, HERSHEY BLISS 1

The Anchorage Igloos entered the Vandenberg Cup Finals as heavy favorites.  The “favorite” label can come with considerable pressure in the playoffs, as anything can happen in a short series.  In Game 1, at least, the Igloos didn’t let the pressure get to them, as they scored three goals in the first period and cruised to a 5-1 win over the Hershey Bliss.

“If all the games are this easy, it’ll be a short series,” said Anchorage RW Nicklas Ericsson, who had a goal and two assists.  “But we know they won’t all be this easy.”

The Bliss put themselves in trouble in the first period, committing four penalties.  The Igloos took advantage, scoring a pair of power-play goals.  Four minutes into the game, Hershey D Nikolai Kulkarov was whistled for hooking when he brought down Anchorage C Derek Humplik in order to prevent a breakaway.  Igloos C Jake Frost buried a slapshot from the top of the faceoff circle to make it 1-0.  Late in the period, Bliss C Henry Constantine flipped the puck over the glass for a delay of game penalty.  Before they could kill it off, D Joel Baldwin tried to draw a tripping call, but was called for embellishment.  Igloos RW Remi Montrechere cashed in during the waning seconds of the period, putting a rebound home past a sprawled Brandon Colt.  In between, LW Les Collins scored during 5-on-5 play, and the Igloos went to the locker room with a 3-0 edge, depsite being outshot 19-8.  The crowd at Arctic Circle Arena razzed the visiting Bliss on their way into the locker room.

“We were a little shell-shocked,” said Bliss C Justin Valentine of the first 20 minutes.  “We’d dominated long stretches of play, but look at the scoreboard and they were wiping the floor with us.”

In the second period, Baldwin tried to fire up his struggling team by starting a pair of fights.  In mid-period, he responded to a rough check by RW Tony Citrone by throwing hands with him.  Late in the period, he scrapped with Collins after the two traded jabs during a faceoff.

“I felt like we needed to shake things up,” said Baldwin.  “And I thought a good fight or two might change the momentum.”

Baldwin’s fisticuffs failed to spark Hershey, however, as Anchorage LW Jerry Koons scored the only goal of the period, yet another power-play tally.

Bliss LW Noah Daniels salvaged some dignity for his team, scoring four and a half minutes into the third period to foil Anchorage netminder Ty Worthington‘s shutout bid.  But Ericsson put one more home for the Igloos to restore their four-goal advantage, and that’s how the game ended.

Hershey coach Chip Barber was crestfallen after the game.  “Not the way that we wanted to start this series,” Barber told reporters.  “This loss was as bitter as biting into a chunk of backer’s chocolate.  But it only counts as one loss, thank goodness.”

Barber highlighted a couple of areas for his team to improve on in Game 2.  “Obviously, we’ve got to cut down on the penalties,” the Bliss coach said.  “Against a team this good, you can’t give them extra chances.  And we’ve got to find ways to get some more pucks past Worthington.”  The Igloos goalie made 38 saves in the game.

Continue reading “2017 SHL Finals – Game 1”

SHL Offseason Trade Summary

The following trades took place in the offseason before Season 2:

Seattle SmallHamilton SmallThe expansion Seattle Sailors made a splash and landed some veteran talent to guide them in their inaugural campaign.  The Sailors acquired C Cliff Derringer, RW “King George” Lane, and D Hylton Windham from the Hamilton Pistols in exchange for first-round and third-round picks and F Elmo Jacobson.  In Derringer, the Sailors land a solid scorer (21 goals and 35 points last season) who is expected to anchor their top line.  Lane, meanwhile, is a capable passer (23 assists in 2015) who may be placed on the top line to feed Derringer and top draft pick Vince Mango.  Windham appeared in limited action for Hamilton last season, scoring 4 points in 22 games, but is best known for being the first native of the Bahamas to play professional hockey.  The Pistols are rebuilding under new coach Keith Shields, and the picks (which were used to draft D Clayton “Crusher” Risch and LW Norris “Beaver” Young) will help position the team for the future.  The 24-year-old Jacobson spent last season with Saskatchewan, for whom he scored 9 points.

Quebec SmallNew York smallThe other expansion team, the Quebec Tigres, made several moves after the expansion draft. First, they dealt RW Kenny Patterson and D Teddy Morrison to the New York Night in exchange for LW Pascal Royal.  The Tigres have made a point of acquiring as many Quebec natives as possible, and Royal certainly qualifies.  He will also provide the Tigres with a dose of badly-needed offense, having put up 15 goals and 40 points in New York.  Patterson is being reunited with his former club, as Quebec plucked him from New York in the expansion draft.  The winger scored 13 goals and 37 points for the Night last year.  Morrison was a gritty defender who spent last season with Washington, putting up 12 points in 56 games.

Quebec SmallSaskatchewan SmallThe Tigres also strengthened their blue line by acquiring Viktor Babykin, a rugged stay-home defenseman, from the Saskatchewan Shockers, along with F Alois Rodney in exchange for rookie D Brody “Bruiser” McCallan.  Babykin is known as one of the SHL’s meanest players, a man who never hesitates to drop the gloves and was one of the league leaders in penalty minutes last year.  His pugnacious personality also created some friction in the Shockers locker room, however.  The 21-year-old McCallan, the Tigres’ third-round draft pick, spent last season in the Quebec junior league, where he put up 12 points.  Rodney, who was the last player selected in the draft,  put up 6 points in limited action in the Swiss league last season.

Quebec SmallHamilton SmallIn their final deal, the Tigres picked up another left winger, Stellan Fisker, from the Hamilton Pistols.  Fisker put up 17 goals and 30 points for Hamilton last season.  The Pistols sent Fisker and the just-acquired Jacobson to Quebec in exchange for a pair of rookies, LW Magnus Gunnarson and the aforementioned Rodney, and a second-round pick in next year’s draft.  Gunnarson, who was selected in the second round by Quebec, scored 15 goals last season for Lake Erie State.

Hershey SmallAnchorage SmallThe Hershey Bliss and the Anchorage Igloos struck a major deal on draft night, with the Bliss sending G Riley Lattimore to the Igloos in exchange for RW Sven Danielsen.  Lattimore began last season as Hershey’s starting goalie, but struggled and wound up losing playing time to backup Milo Stafford.  Lattimore finished the season with a 12-18-1 record with a 3.70 GAA, as the Bliss stumbled to a disappointing third-place finish in the East.  He became expendable after Hershey picked netminder Buzz Carson in the second round of the draft.  Lattimore will serve as a backup in Anchorage, who lost their former second-string goalie, Ron Mason, to Seattle in the expansion draft.  Danielsen, meanwhile, spent last season on the second line for the champion Igloos, netting 11 goals and 28 points.  He lost his spot on the Anchorage depth chart to Remi Montrechere, as the Igloos found themselves with forward depth to spare.

Dakota SmallHamilton SmallIn a minor swap of defenders, the Dakota Rapids shipped Jose Martinez and rookie Fyodor Agrozonov to the Hamilton Pistols for Pierre Chappelle.  Chapelle was a solid two-way defenseman for the Pistols last season, putting up 10 points.  Martinez was an offensive-minded defender who struggled somewhat in Dakota, posting 7 points in 52 games.  Agrozonov is a 22-year-old who played the last two seasons in the KHL.

2015 SHL Finals – Game 5

Washington SmallAnchorage SmallWASHINGTON GALAXY 3, ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 1

With one more game at home in the SHL Finals, the Washington Galaxy were eager to capture a victory and move to the brink of capturing the Vandy. They got what they wanted, snagging a 3-1 win and leaving the heavily favored Anchorage Igloos needing to claim back-to-back wins in order to avoid a stunning upset loss in the Finals.

“This is not the position we wanted to be in,” said Igloos C Jake Frost.  “We established ourselves as the best team all season long, and for us to lose the Finals… that would be a real blow.”

Just as they did in game 4, the Galaxy struck first.  When C Eddie Costello scored on a three-on-one a little more than four minutes into the game, the crowd at Constellation Center practically raised the roof with delight.  “The place was really rocking,” said Washington RW Jefferson McNeely.  “The fans were believing right from the start, and we were believing too.”

Igloos C Broni Zhlotkin dampened the crowd’s enthusiasm with less than two minutes left in the period, redirecting a blue-line shot by RW Remi Montrechere and beating Galaxy goaltender Roger Orion stick-side to even the score at 1.

“For us, getting it back even before the break was key,” said Montrechere.  “We didn’t want them getting too confident.  The momentum was shifting away from us, and we needed to snatch it back.”

In a repeat of Game 2, the 1-1 tie persisted through a scoreless second period, as both teams took turns making furious rushes to no effect.  In the first half of the period, the Igloos dominated the action, stepping up the pace of action with their patented fast breaks and trying to overwhelm the depleted Washington skaters.  Orion did a valiant job turning them aside, although on two separate occasions Anchorage rang shots off the post.

In the latter half of the period, Washington took its turn in the driver’s seat, scarcely letting the Igloos get the puck out of their own end and bombarding Worthington with shots.  But the Anchorage netminder held firm, keeping the Galaxy from breaking the tie.  The home fans remained excited, but their cheers took on a nervous edge.

“When [the Igloos] were trying to race past us and we were able to stop them, that got everybody fired up,” said Galaxy LW Casey Thurman.  “But then we threw everything we had at them and we couldn’t get it done either.  And we all felt like this was a must-win game for us.  It was getting intense.”

The Galaxy got a much-needed break 2:47 into the third period.  Although the referees had been calling a fairly loose game to that point, head linesman Scott Pritchard whistled Anchorage D Hans Mortensen for a controversial interference call, sending the Igloos bench into hysterics.  Igloos coach Sam Castor remained miffed about the penalty even after the game.

“We got burned by inconsistent officiating,” said the Anchorage coach.  “If they’d been calling it tight all game, fine.  But they’d already made it clear they were going to let the teams play, at least up until that point.  There were easily a half-dozen things [the Galaxy] did that were worse than what Hans did, with no call.  All I ask for is consistency.  If something’s not a penalty in the first, it shouldn’t be in the third.”

Castor and the Igloos only became more furious when Galaxy LW Todd Douglas beat Worthington top-shelf 32 seconds into the power play to put Washington ahead. “That one really burns,” said Castor.  “It was a knife in the gut at the worst possible time.”

Less than three minutes later, an Anchorage defensive breakdown sprung Douglas on a breakaway; he fed C Drustan Zarkovich, who slid the puck under Worthington’s right pad for a 3-1 lead.

“You’ve really got to look in the mirror if Drustan beats you on a breakaway,” Galaxy coach Rodney Reagle quipped after the game.  “He’s a great guy and a good player, but he’s not exactly a racehorse out there.”

After securing the two-goal edge, the Galaxy spent the rest of the game in a defensive mode.  With Orion (30 saves) continuing to provide stout netminding, Washington preserved their win and took a 3-2 lead in the series.

“All we’ve got to do now is win one in Anchorage, and we’ve already done that,” said Thurman.  “We’re ready for this.”

The Igloos headed home fueled by anger at the late call against Mortensen.  “A lot of guys in here feel like the refs won this one, not the other team,” said Frost.  “We’re not looking for the refs to decide this series.  We want to take care of business ourselves.”

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