2019 SHL Finals – Game 3

HAMILTON PISTOLS 3, ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 2 (OVERTIME)

(Hamilton leads, 2-1)

Through the first three games, the 2019 SHL Finals have a distinctive rhythm.  There’s a fast-paced first period, in which the Anchorage Igloos and Hamilton Pistols fire shots by the bucketload but don’t score.  The action settles down somewhat in the second and third, as the teams trade goals (with Anchorage drawing first blood) as well as near-misses.  In the end, one team wins by a single goal; often, regulation isn’t enough to settle matters.

The venue shifted for Game 3 from Anchorage’s Arctic Circle Arena to Hamilton’s Gunpowder Armory.  But the teams followed the familiar script, all the way to Eddie Costello’s overtime goal that gave the Pistols a 3-2 victory and a 2-1 series lead.

“We’re going toe-to-toe with the defending champs and we’re pulling out wins,” said Pistols coach Keith Shields.  “That tells you a lot about the strength and fearlessness of the guys in this locker room.”

The fans at Gunpowder Armory are well-known for making a lot of noise, especially in the postseason.  During the division series, the Hershey Bliss let the crowd noise get in their heads, and they went on to lose the series.  The Igloos said that the racket wouldn’t bother them, and that proved to be true.  They came out of the gate just as fast and trigger-happy as they had at home, outshooting the Pistols 17-13 in the first period.  But Pistols goalie Lasse Koskinen turned aside all of the Igloos attempts, just as Anchorage’s Ty Worthington did for the baker’s dozen of Hamilton shots.

Then came the second period, and the scoring began.  Anchorage went a man to the good just 22 seconds into the period when Pistols D Hercules Mulligan sent the puck over the glass for a delay of game penalty.  LW Les Collins proceeded to make the Pistols pay, firing a low hard shot that Koskinen couldn’t quite pick up.

Hamilton didn’t strike back quite as quickly as they had in earlier games.  But just over four minutes after Collins’ tally, LW Jamie Campbell tied things up by netting a wraparound shot before Worthington could seal off the post.  The Igloos had several opportunities to retake the lead courtesy of three Pistols penalties later in the period, but they couldn’t convert and the period ended in a 1-1 tie.

In each of the first two games, the Pistols scored quickly in the third period.  This game followed that pattern, as C Calvin Frye put one in before the period was two minutes old, giving Hamilton its first lead of the game.  The old building rattled as the fans roared, clapped, and stomped in salute of their heroes.

“Honestly, it felt like the whole place was going to shake itself apart,” said Igloos C Nile Bernard.  “We could feel the movement on the bench, and I was kind of eyeing the rafters like, ‘Uh, guys, is it safe…?’”

Anchorage, though, didn’t let the deficit or the screaming fans or the rumbling arena bother them.  They focused on keeping the Pistols from adding to their lead, while trying to win more zone time on offense.  This effort paid off just before the midpoint of the period, as C Jake Frost received a perfect one-touch pass from RW Nicklas Ericsson and ripped home a shot before Koskinen could react, tying it up at 2 apiece.

“That top line of [Anchorage’s] is just sick,” said Mulligan.  “You know they’re going to feed it to Frost if they can, but then they do and you can’t stop it.  It’s a lot like Alex [Steven Alexander] and our top line that way.”

Anchorage took a couple of minor penalties in the back half of the third period, which gave Hamilton golden opportunities for a go-ahead goal.  They nearly had one in the final minute of the game, when Alexander fired a shot that Worthington got a piece of but couldn’t stop completely.  The puck trickled toward the goal line and nearly over it, but D Olaf Martinsson swooped in and whacked it away.  The Pistols asked for a replay review, and it was determine that the puck had gone partway over the line but not completely.  No goal, and on to overtime.

The extra session started out a bit slowly, as both teams looked a bit tired and sluggish.  The action frequently bogged down in the neutral zone.  But a little past the two-minute mark, RW Ben Summers slipped on a soft patch of ice while crossing over the red line and went down, losing control of the puck.  Pistols D Raymond Smyth won a race to the puck, started down the ice, then found Costello.

The ex-Galaxy center was the overtime hero of the series-clinching Game 4 against Hershey, and he was ready to do it again.  He skated hard toward the net, getting behind the defense.  He deked a bit with the puck, trying to get Worthington out of position.  Then he went shortside over Worthington’s outstretched stick for the game-winning goal.

“Easy Eddie does it again!” said Shields with a grin.  “I love that guy.  He’s knows how to get it done with style.”

Igloos coach Sam Castor was generally pleased with his team’s effort, even in a losing cause.  “Every game in this series so far has basically been dead even,” Castor said.

The coach added, however, that he wanted to see his team win Game 4.  “Getting back to even and getting the home-ice advantage back, that’s crucial,” Castor said.  “I’m not calling it a must-win, but you don’t want to go down 3-1.  We don’t want to be in that hole.”

Continue reading “2019 SHL Finals – Game 3”

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2019 SHL Finals – Game 1

ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 3, HAMILTON PISTOLS 2 (OVERTIME)

(Anchorage leads, 1-0)

If Game 1 sets the tone for the 2019 SHL Finals, fans are in for a treat.  The Anchorage Igloos and Hamilton Pistols combined to give fans a fast-paced, highly-skilled, closely-contested thrill ride.  The game was so closely contested, in fact, that it couldn’t be resolved in regulation.  But in the end, C Jake Frost and the Igloos sent the fans at Arctic Circle Arena home happy with a 3-2 overtime win.

“This was a hockey master class,” said Frost.  “Both teams were really on their toes and playing at a really, really high level.  This series is gonna be lit.”

The energy on both sides was palpable even before the game started.  As the national anthems played, players on both teams bounced up and down on their skates, like bulls waiting for the gate to open.  It was little surprise that the Pistols, making their first Finals appearance, would be so fired up.  But the champion Igloos were just as hyped.

That energy expressed itself in a frenetic first period.  No one scored in the first, but not for a lack of trying: the teams combined to unleash 33 shots in the period, with Anchorage taking 20 of them.  Igloos coach Sam Castor felt that the action was a little too frenzied, and cautioned his team between periods to moderate their pace a bit.

“I know our guys were trying to take the early lead and make a statement,” Castor said, “but the game was turning into a track meet, and we were flinging shots at the net as soon as we got the puck into their zone.  I told them to be a little more deliberate and make our shots count.”

The first-period sugar high wore off in the second, and the game settled into a still-swift but reasonable tempo.  It didn’t take the Igloos long to get their much-desired lead, as LW Les Collins scored on a slapshot from the slot just over a minute into the frame.

“I saw just enough daylight for the shot, so I took it,” said Collins.

A couple minutes afterward, though, Collins headed to the sin bin on a high-sticking call.  Hamilton LW Steven Alexander wasted no time banging home a slapper of his own to tie the score.

“We know that if we can get the puck on Alex’s stick on the PP, good things will happen,” said C Calvin Frye.

The tie lasted barely more than 90 seconds before rookie Igloos LW Jean Pierre Fleury redirected a shot over the right pad of Pistols goalie Lasse Koskinen to give the home team a 2-1 lead.  The champs’ confidence only grew as they killed off three additional penalties in the period.  The Igloos adjusted their penalty-kill approach to overload toward Alexander, and the Pistols were unable to make them pay.

After two periods, the momentum seemed firmly in Anchorage’s corner, as they held onto their one-goal lead.  But less than a minute into the frame, Collins was whistled for another penalty, this time for cross-checking.  On the ensuing faceoff, Hamilton fed the puck to Alexander, as expected.  But the star winger faked a shot, then slung a pass to D Clayton Risch, who fired it to fellow blueliner Hercules Mulligan.  Mulligan then fired the shot past Igloos netminder Ty Worthington, who never seemed to see it.  Tie game.

Collins, frustrated at taking the penalties that allowed Hamilton to score both their goals, was now fiercely determined to make up for it with another goal of his own.  He got a chance midway through the period, when Koskinen bit on a fake slapper from C Nile Bernard, and Collins found himself with the puck and a yawning net.  Unfortunately, he was so wound up that he fired the shot high over the crossbar.  Collins then skated back to the bench and smashed his stick to bits, a rare display of emotion for the reserved forward.

The third period featured chances for both teams, but both Koskinen and Worthington made sensational stops to keep things deadlocked through the end of regulation.

Going into overtime, the Igloos were determined to take the win.  “We weren’t about to let [the Pistols] get the jump on us on our ice,” said Frost.

In the extra session, Anchorage was able to control the play far better than they had in regulation.  They repeatedly denied Hamilton opportunities to set up on offense, and kept most of the action in the other end.  Finally, a bit over two minutes in, Frost and LW Jerry Koons broke out on a 2-on-1, which Koons finished by going top-shelf over Koskinen’s right shoulder.

“Winning the first one, that’s big for us,” said Koons.  “But this is going to be a long series, and we’re going to have to stay sharp.  That’s a talented bunch on the other side, that’s for sure.”

Pistols coach Keith Shields was encouraged by his team’s performance, loss notwithstanding.  “We showed that we can go toe to toe with those guys,” Shields said.  “The game could have gone either way.  I believe we sent them a message that we need to be taken seriously.”

Continue reading “2019 SHL Finals – Game 1”

2019 SHL Division Playoff – Game 3

Western Division Series (Anchorage wins, 3-0)

ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 3, SEATTLE SAILORS 1

When it comes to the SHL Western Division Series, the Anchorage Igloos can’t be beat.  Literally.  Last year, facing the heavily favored Michigan Gray Wolves, the Igloos dispatched them in a shocking three-game sweep.  This year, facing a Seattle Sailors team making its first postseason appearance and riding high on the emotion of their impending move to Portland, the Igloos once again didn’t drop a single game.  Today’s 3-1 victory in Game 3 completes another sweep, one that sends Anchorage to the SHL Finals for the third year in a row.

“We know how to play our best hockey at this time of year,” said Igloos C Jake Frost.  “We’ve been here before, so we know what it takes to win.  We don’t hesitate to step up our game, whether that’s pulling longer shifts or sacrificing our bodies to make plays.  It’s second nature to us, because we’ve been here before.”

As has been typical for this series, the game was fast-paced and filled with offense.  Both Anchorage’s Ty Worthington and Seattle’s Rocky Goldmire were under siege from the beginning, as the teams combined for 33 shots in the first period.  Both goalies were up to the task, though, and only one shot made it through: a bouncer from Igloos RW Ben Summers that deflected off the stick of a Sailors defender and into the net, giving Anchorage a 1-0 lead at the midway point of the period.

Seattle struck back early in the second, as C Marco Venezio finished an 3-on-1 rush by putting the biscuit into a wide-open net.  The crowd at Century 21 Arena roared its approval, and Igloos coach Sam Castor called time and admonished his team to tighten up on defense.

“I told my guys that there’s a difference between playing up-tempo and playing firewagon hockey,” said Castor after the game.  “I felt like we were trading chances with those guys, and we’re better than that.  I told them I didn’t want to see any more odd-man rushes.”

Heeding their coach’s instructions, Anchorage played a more disciplined game afterward, slowly suffocating Seattle’s chances.  The Igloos’ work in the third period was particularly masterful, as they repeatedly frustrated the Sailors’ zone entries while maintaining offensive pressure of their own.

“The third was just a clinic by our guys,” said Castor.  “It’s like we set up a brick wall at the blue line and wouldn’t let [the Sailors] in.”

The Igloos got the lead back just over four minutes into the final period.  C Nile Bernard picked the pocket of Sailors RW Elliott Pepper as he crossed through center ice.  Bernard then fired a perfect pass to LW Les Collins, who streaked past the Seattle defenders and beat Goldmire on the blocker side.

A couple minutes later, Sailors RW Vince Mango took a rare penalty for high-sticking on a failed lift check.  On the ensuing power play, C Jake Frost collected the puck in the slot and put it past Goldmire, giving Anchorage a bit of insurance.

Things got a bit hairy for the Igloos in the final minute of the game, as they took a pair of penalties in quick succession and the Sailors pulled Goldmire for a 6-on-3 advantage.  But the Igloos penalty kill and Worthington held strong, and the game ended with the lead intact.

The Igloos now await the winner of the Eastern playoff between Hamilton and Hershey.  “I think we feel pretty confident against either of those teams,” said Frost.  “They’re both strong teams, but neither one has the kind of experience we do.”

Sailors coach Harold Engellund expressed remorse at the sweep.  “I really hoped we could at least win one for our fans here at home,” said Engellund.  “Would have been a nice going-away present.  But those guys, they’ve just got so many ways to beat you.  I hope we can learn from the experience and come back stronger next year.”

 

W Final - Game 3, Anchorage @ Seattle, Century 21 Arena

                   1   2   3   OT   F
Anchorage          1   0   2        3
Seattle            0   1   0        1

 
Anchorage              G   A PTS PIM +/-   Seattle                G   A PTS PIM +/-

Koons           LW     0   1   1   2   0   Argent          LW     0   0   0   0   0
Keefe           D      0   0   0   0   1   Lambert         D      0   0   0   0  -1
Frost           C      1   0   1   0   0   Beasley         C      0   0   0   0   0
Martinsson      D      0   0   0   0   1   Lidjya          D      0   0   0   0  -1
Ericsson        RW     0   1   1   2   0   Mango           RW     0   0   0   2   0
Collins         LW     1   0   1   0   2   Lane            LW     0   0   0   2   1
Bernard         C      0   2   2   0   2   Mortensen       D      0   0   0   2   0
Frederick       D      0   0   0   4   0   Derringer       C      0   0   0   0  -2
Summers         RW     1   0   1   2   2   Gatecliff       D      0   0   0   2   0
Miranda         LW     0   0   0   0  -1   Pepper          RW     0   0   0   0  -2
Citrone         D      0   0   0   2   0   Gaspard         LW     0   0   0   0  -2
Theroux         C      0   0   0   2  -1   Fairwood        D      0   0   0   6   0
Calligan        D      0   0   0   0   0   Venezio         C      1   0   1   2   1
Fleury          RW     0   0   0   0  -1   Durien          RW     0   1   1   0   1
Kerasov         D      0   1   1   0   0   Gallagher       D      0   1   1   0   0
----------------------------------------   ----------------------------------------
TOTALS                 3   5   8  14   1   TOTALS                 1   2   3  16  -1

Scratches:
ANC:  Pomfret (DL), Kennedy, Zhlotkin
SEA:  Snelling, Bacon, McElvern

 
Anchorage           SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Worthington         40    39    1  0.975

Seattle             SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Goldmire            38    35    3  0.921

 

First Period
------------

GOALS:
09:55  ANC  Summers (Kerasov, Bernard)

PENALTIES:
02:31  ANC  Koons 2:00 (Roughing)
04:01  ANC  Frederick 2:00 (High-sticking)
05:53  SEA  Fairwood 2:00 (Hooking)
06:19  SEA  Venezio 2:00 (Diving)
12:05  SEA  Fairwood 2:00 (Unsportsmanlike Conduct)
12:15  SEA  Mortensen 2:00 (High-sticking)

Second Period
-------------

GOALS:
01:48  SEA  Venezio (Durien, Gallagher)

PENALTIES:
02:16  SEA  Fairwood 2:00 (Slashing)
09:29  SEA  Lane 2:00 (Slashing)
10:46  ANC  Ericsson 2:00 (Tripping)

Third Period
------------

GOALS:
04:08  ANC  Collins (Bernard)
07:21  ANC  Frost PP (Koons, Ericsson)

PENALTIES:
01:35  ANC  Summers 2:00 (High-sticking)
04:14  ANC  Citrone 2:00 (Diving)
06:41  SEA  Mango 2:00 (High-sticking)
12:11  SEA  Gatecliff 2:00 (Tripping)
19:15  ANC  Frederick 2:00 (High-sticking)
19:22  ANC  Theroux 2:00 (Diving)


 
SHOTS
------
                   1   2   3   OT   F
Anchorage         14  10  14       38
Seattle           19  10  11       40

 
POWER PLAYS
-----------

Anchorage        1 for 8
Seattle          0 for 7

 
INJURIES
--------

None

 

Eastern Division Series (Hamilton leads, 2-1)

HAMILTON PISTOLS 5, HERSHEY BLISS 0

Coming into the postseason, the Hamilton Pistols felt that they had a secret weapon: their rowdy home crowds.  The Gunpowder Armory is the league’s oldest arena by far, and Hamilton’s hockey-mad fans know how to rattle the rafters with their claps, stomps, and cheers.  During last year’s playoff against Quebec, the Pistols looked like a different team in front of their home crowd; they had an extra spark, some extra crowd-fueled energy.

“We’ve got good working-class fans here who love the game,” said coach Keith Shields.  “And when they’ve got a couple beers in ‘em and they’re feeling that playoff energy… well, they make a ton of noise, and it really fires our guys up.  We’ve got the best fans in the league, if you ask me.”

In today’s Game 3, the Armory was at full crazy, and the Pistols responded.  They blew past the shell-shocked Hershey Bliss, and moved themselves within a game of their first Finals appearance with a 5-0 shutout.

“[The Bliss] didn’t know what hit ‘em,” said Shields.  “As soon as they took the ice and heard our fans hollering their lungs out… you could see it in their eyes.  They didn’t know how to handle it.”

The roar in the building was deafening at opening puck drop.  It didn’t get any quieter when Bliss D Cedric Meloche was penalized for tripping just ten seconds into the game.  And when Pistols RW Kenny Patterson found the lower left corner of the net on the ensuing power play, it felt as though the old arena might just tumble to the ground.

“The bench was literally shaking,” said LW Steven Alexander.  “It was kind of like, ‘Holy [crap], is this an earthquake?’”

The crowd shouted hosannas to Patterson and jeers to the Bliss.  The hubbub had barely died down when Patterson scored again, this time on a sharp angle shot that Bliss goalie Brandon Colt couldn’t quite reach.

For Patterson, a veteran winger who was contemplating retirement before signing an extension with Hamilton last summer, the playoff atmosphere validated his decision to return.

“As a player, this is what you get up for,” said Patterson.  “The energy in the building was just through the roof, and we definitely fed off of that.”

The Bliss managed to keep the Pistols off the board for the rest of the period, and the crowd’s buzz dimmed a bit as the scoreless second period unfolded.  Late in the period, though, Hershey D Bruce Minnik made the fateful decision to pick a fight with Hamilton D Clayton “Crusher” Risch.  Minnik said later that he was trying to fire up his team.  He may have done that, but the fight also woke up the crowd, which got back to full boil in the final minute of the period when Bliss LW Russ Nahorniak was sent to the penalty box for hooking.

At the start of the third, Hershey found themselves in a 5-on-3 situation when D Steve Cargill was sent off for cross-checking.  The Bliss managed to kill of the penalty, but they couldn’t get the puck out of their end, and RW Claude Lafayette made the exhausted visitors pay with a redirection of a Vitaly Dyomin slap shot that beat Colt.

“We knew we’d won at that point, and so did they,” said Lafayette.

The Pistols gave their fans plenty to cheer in the remainder of the period: goals from LW Magnus Gunnarson and D Albie Glasco, and a rousing fight between D Hercules Mulligan and Cargill.  But as the minutes wound down, the crowd had a different goal in mind.  For the last ten minutes, chants of “Over in four!  Over in four!” echoed through the old area.

Alexander is on board with the fans’ desire.  “We want to get this done, right here, and celebrate with our fans on home ice,” he said.  “They’ve come this far with us, and they deserve it.”

 

E Final - Game 3, Hershey @ Hamilton, Gunpowder Armory

                   1   2   3   OT   F
Hershey            0   0   0        0
Hamilton           2   0   3        5

 
Hershey                G   A PTS PIM +/-   Hamilton               G   A PTS PIM +/-

Milton          D      0   0   0   4   0   Alexander       LW     0   1   1   0   2
Valentine       C      0   0   0   0  -2   Smyth           D      0   2   2   0   2
Baldwin         D      0   0   0   0  -2   Frye            C      0   1   1   0   2
Hart            RW     0   0   0   0  -2   Risch           D      0   0   0   7   0
Nahorniak       LW     0   0   0   2  -2   Lafayette       RW     1   1   2   0   2
Meloche         D      0   0   0   2  -2   Gunnarson       LW     1   0   1   0   1
Kirkpatrick     C      0   0   0   0  -1   Mulligan        D      0   0   0   5   0
Montrechere     RW     0   0   0   0  -1   Glasco          D      1   1   2   0   2
Danielsen       LW     0   0   0   0  -1   Patterson       RW     2   0   2   0   1
Aubin           D      0   0   0   0  -2   Campbell        LW     0   0   0   0   1
Daniels         RW     0   0   0   0  -1   Dyomin          D      0   1   1   0   2
Minnik          D      0   0   0   5  -2   Marais          C      0   1   1   0   1
Ketterman       C      0   0   0   0  -1   Hampton         D      0   1   1   0   2
Swindonburg     LW     0   0   0   0  -1   Estabrook       F      0   0   0   2   1
Cargill         D      0   0   0   7   0   Costello        C      0   1   1   0   1
----------------------------------------   ----------------------------------------
TOTALS                 0   0   0  20  -4   TOTALS                 5  10  15  14   4

Scratches:
HSY:  Kulkarov, Chappelle, Lapointe, Sweet (DL)
HAM:  Constantine, Baker, Klemmer

 
Hershey             SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Colt                30    25    5  0.833

Hamilton            SH    SV    G    Sv%
----------------------------------------
Koskinen            23    23    0  1.000

 

First Period
------------

GOALS:
01:19  HAM  Patterson PP (Smyth, Glasco)
06:55  HAM  Patterson (Smyth, Costello)

PENALTIES:
00:10  HSY  Meloche 2:00 (Tripping)
18:01  HAM  Estabrook 2:00 (Roughing)
18:48  HSY  Milton 4:00 (Spearing)

Second Period
-------------

GOALS:
None


PENALTIES:
15:03  HAM  Risch 5:00 (Fighting)
15:03  HSY  Minnik 5:00 (Fighting)
19:18  HSY  Nahorniak 2:00 (Hooking)

Third Period
------------

GOALS:
02:51  HAM  Lafayette (Dyomin, Alexander)
09:47  HAM  Gunnarson (Hampton, Marais)
15:14  HAM  Glasco (Lafayette, Frye)

PENALTIES:
00:01  HSY  Cargill 2:00 (Cross-checking)
10:48  HAM  Risch 2:00 (Hooking)
14:12  HAM  Mulligan 5:00 (Fighting)
14:12  HSY  Cargill 5:00 (Fighting)


 
SHOTS
------
                   1   2   3   OT   F
Hershey            9   5   9       23
Hamilton          15   7   8       30

 
POWER PLAYS
-----------

Hershey          0 for 2
Hamilton         1 for 4

 
INJURIES
--------

None

SHL Player of the Week – Week 4

Nile Bernard

The SHL selected Anchorage Igloos C Nile Bernard as its Player of the Week.  Bernard was the leading point-getter for Anchorage during their unbeaten week, putting up 6 points (3 goals, 3 assists).  For the season, has a total of 17 points (7 goals, 10 assists), one behind LW Les Collins for the team lead.

On Sunday, Bernard scored the first goal of the game and assisted on the second as the Igloos downed Dakota 5-3.   On Tuesday, he again produced a goal and an assist to help hand Michigan its first loss of the season, 4-1.  On Thursday, Bernard scored the game’s last goal as Anchorage jolted the Jackalopes 4-1.

“Obviously, our top line is key to our success, but our second line has really done the job this year,” said Igloos coach Sam Castor.  “You need depth to win championships, and I’m glad to say that we have it.”

2018 SHL Finals – Game 1

ANCHORAGE IGLOOS 2, QUEBEC TIGRES 0

Coming into the SHL Finals, the conventional wisdom was that whichever team controlled the pace would have the edge in the series.  If the speedy Anchorage Igloos could turn the series into a track meet, they would likely prevail.  On the other hand, if the Quebec Tigres could slow things down and keep the Igloos from running past them, their dogged defense and excellent goaltending would give them the edge.

The outcome of Game 1 scrambled that narrative a bit.  Quebec succeeded in slowing the game down; the Igloos weren’t able to pull off any of their famed breakaways and odd-man rushes.  In fact, Anchorage didn’t even outshoot the Tigres.  But Igloos goaltender Ty Worthington outdueled his Tigres counterpart Riki Tiktuunen, and Anchorage emerged with a 2-0 win at Centre Citadelle.

“This game was a testament to our versatility as a team,” said Igloos coach Sam Castor.  “We like to play fast and furious, but even when our opponent is able to slow us down, we can still go toe-to-toe and win that kind of game.”

During their division series sweep of the Michigan Gray Wolves, who play a trapping style similar to Quebec’s, Anchorage pushed the pace early in order to get an early lead and set their opponent on its heels.  The Igloos weren’t able to do the same thing in this game, thanks in part to the fact that they were whistled for four penalties in the first period alone.  They successfully killed off all four, but Castor was displeased with what he saw as one-sided officiating.  The coach was spotted giving head referee Scott Pritchard an earful as the period drew to a close.

“I wanted to draw his attention to the disparity in the calls,” said Castor wryly after the game.  “But we’ve got to recognize that it’s [Quebec’s] game.  They’ve got guys who pester you and get under your skin, then you retaliate and that’s what the officials see, so you get penalized.  We can’t let them bait us.”

Despite all the calls against them, the Igloos had a lead after the first, thanks to a good break just over four minutes in.  C Nile Bernard blistered a shot toward the right post.  Tiktuunen made a tremendous sprawling save, but allowed a juicy rebound.  The puck wound up on the stick of LW Les Collins; he threaded a pass to D Ted Keefe, who was parked on the left edge of the crease.  Keefe buried the puck in the upper left corner of the net before Tiktuunen could react.

“That was a real heads-up play by Les,” said Bernard.  “He recognized in a split second that Tiktuunen might stop his follow-up, but Keefer had a wide-open look.  That was huge.”

The second period was a bit of a slog, as the Tigres frustrated Anchorage’s zone entries again and again, and the puck seemingly spent the entire period ping-ponging around the neutral zone.  The Igloos played a patient game, probing for seams in Quebec’s defense and not finding many.  The team combined for only 15 shots in the period.

In the third, Quebec had to kill off a carryover penalty, then a slashing penalty to LW Walt Camernitz a couple minutes later.  The effort seemed to leave the Tigres fatigued, and they struggled to keep up the same pressure they had earlier.  Shortly after the end of the Camernitz penalty, the Igloos set up shop in the Quebec zone.  The Tigres tried several times to clear the puck out of their end, to no avail.  Finally, after over a minute and a half of zone time, Frost crashed the net, then faked a slapshot before firing it back to D Tony Citrone at the point.  Citrone laced a one-touch pass to LW Jerry Koons in the left faceoff circle, and he beat Tiktuunen short side.

“We were under a great strain, and we buckled,” said Tigres coach Martin Delorme.  “It was a brief lapse, but we cannot afford those against a team this strong.”

Now facing a two-goal deficit, the Tigres found their second wind and pushed hard down the stretch.  Nearly half of their total shots in the game (13 of 28) came in the third, almost all of them after Koons’ tally.  When Igloos LW Waldo Miranda received a double minor with a minute and a half left in the game, Quebec yanked Tiktuunen for a 6-on-4 advantage.  They peppered the Anchorage net with shots, but Worthington came up huge, making one athletic save after another.

“Ty came through the fire there in the end,” said Castor.  “He’s not flashy, but he gets the job done.”

With the win, Anchorage seized home-ice advantage from the Tigres.  Delorme said that he was not about to panic, however.  “Of course, we would have liked to win,” said the Quebec coach.  “But we are not going to let one close defeat shake our confidence.  We will go out in Game 2 and we will prevail.”

Continue reading “2018 SHL Finals – Game 1”

Announcer’s Joke Sparks Fish Incident in Michigan

The Anchorage Igloos have faced a lot of obstacles this season as they’ve attempted to defend their division title.  They’ve struggled to put together lengthy winning streaks.  They’ve lagged far behind their rivals, the Michigan Gray Wolves, in the standings.  Lately, as they’ve tried to nail down a playoff spot, they’ve been hit by a rash of injuries.

On Saturday, the Igloos came in to Cadillac Place to face the Wolves.  They expected a challenging game against their rivals, but they also had to contend with an unexpected challenge: a hail of rotting fish showered down on their bench.

“You figure you’ll have to dodge some tough checks in a game, and maybe a beer sometimes,” said Igloos LW Jerry Koons.  “You’re not really expecting to have to dodge fish.”

Michigan Gray Wolves color commentator Blackie Sprowl.
Blackie Sprowl

The whole thing was triggered by an offhand comment on the Wolves’ radio broadcast during last week’s 13-0 thrashing of Seattle.  In the third period, color commentator Blackie Sprowl was trying to find something to talk about, since the game was completely out of hand.  He wound up launching into a comic monologue about the challenges of the commentator’s life.

“You know, this job is harder than the fans might think,” Sprowl said to play-by-play man Philip Shelton.  “It’s not all free food and fast women, you know.  We got to fly to Anchorage.”

“Yeah, that’s always a tough trip,” said Shelton.

“You go on a 30-hour flight, then you land in this snow-encrusted outpost in the middle of nowhere.  There’s more moose than people, and the whole place smells like rotting fish.  Then you’ve got to take another 30-hour flight back to civilization.  These are the kind of hardships that we put up with for you, fans.”

“Okay, Anchorage isn’t quite that bad,” Shelton interjected.

“Sure it is,” retorted Sprowl.  “Whole place smells like rotten fish.  You know, the next time the Igloos come here, we should put some rotten fish in their dressing room, just so they feel at home.”

“Rotten fish in the dressing room.  Okay,” said Shelton incredulously.  “Sorry, folks, this is what 10-0 does to you.”

“I think it’s great,” said Sprowl.  “They’ll smell those rotten fish and say, ‘Hey, smells like home in here.'”

Ordinarily, that would have been the end of it.  But when Anchorage arrived for Saturday’s game, a group of jokesters showed up with some day-old trout, and during breaks in the action, they began flinging it at the visiting bench.

The first salvo missed the mark, but the second hit Igloos D Ted Keefe flush on the front of his jersey.  The blueliner stared quizzically at the offending fish, then tossed it aside as the fans cheered.  As trout continued to rain down, though, the Igloos’ mood changed from confusion to frustration.  A couple players started checking the fish back at the fans, while others complained to the ushers.  Before long, the section behind the Anchorage bench was chanting “Fish! Fish! Fish!”

Eventually, the PA announcer warned the fans that “anyone throwing fish or other objects at the benches will be ejected.”  The fans booed, but the chucking of sea creatures came to a halt.

The Igloos wound up winning the game, 3-2.  During coach Sam Castor‘s postgame press conference, the first remark out of the coach’s mouth was, “What the hell was with the fish?”  A local reporter explained the story, whereupon Castor rolled his eyes and said, “Listen, my suit costs more than the monthly paycheck of those clowns.  The Wolves can expect a bill from my tailor.”

Igloos C Nile Bernard said that the team took the fish-flinging in stride.  “In fact, we’re packing the fish up and bringing it back home for Petey,” said Bernard, referring to mascot Petey the Polar Bear.  “We’re not going to let that stuff go to waste.”

Interview of the Week: Nile Bernard

This week’s interview is with Anchorage Igloos C Nile Bernard.

SHL Digest: We’re here in the SHL’s northernmost outpost, talking to one of the Igloos’ key contributors, Nile Bernard.  Nile, thanks for speaking with us.

Nile Bernard

Nile Bernard: Sure thing.

SHLD: You’re not one of the famous names in the league, and a lot of fans might not recognize you, but your teammates say that you’re the glue that holds the team together.  How do you do that?

NB: I think that’s really more about the culture we have here.  On a lot of teams, the stars set the tone.  They decide whether the locker room is playful or serious, what kind of music we play after the games, and so on.  But here, it’s not like that.  Here, we all treat each other equally, from Frosty [Jake Frost] to last guy off the bench.  We’re like the Three Musketeers: all for one and one for all.

SHLD: Ah, but it’s more than that.  Your teammates say that you’re sort of the dad of the group.  For instance, when you’re on the road, you’re the one who scouts out new restaurants and makes reservations for the team.

NB: Yeah, I do that.  That’s mainly because I like food, and I like to explore different cities.  Most guys, they’re happy to go out when the game is over, but they just want to go have a good time.  I want to make sure we’re going to places worth going to.

SHLD: You’re also the player that new guys on the team go to for advice or to get situated.  You’ve even had several of the young players stay at your house.

NB: Yeah, that’s true.  I remember how it was when I was a rookie, how difficult it was to adjust to life in the pros.  Especially in a city like Anchorage.  It’s a great city, don’t get me wrong, but it’s a big change if you’re not used to it.  I try to make sure guys feel welcome, help them get their footing, get them pointed in the right direction.  When you’re with the Igloos, you’re part of our family.

SHLD: That’s a good attitude.  Do you think that’s helped the Igloos be one of the SHL’s most successful teams?

NB: Absolutely.  Don’t get me wrong, Coach [Sam] Castor has played a big role, and we’ve got a lot of talented guys.  But that family feeling definitely plays a role.  We trust every last guy on the roster.

SHLD: This year, you guys haven’t been as dominant as usual.  What do you think the issues have been?

NB: I don’t think it’s any one thing.  I think losing the Vandy last year was a blow, and it took us a while to shake it off.  I think our passing has been a little sloppier, our shots not quite on target.  But I think we’re starting to get sharper, and I expect a big second half from us.

SHLD: The trading deadline is coming up.  Do you expect any big moves for the Igloos?

NB: I don’t think so.  We might look for some additional depth, but we’ve all got confidence in the team we have.  Michigan’s going to be a tough battle [in the playoffs], but we’ve got the talent to take them down.

SHLD: Sounds good!  We appreciate the interview, as always.  Good luck in the second half!

NB: Thanks.  Look forward to talking to you again when we win the Vandy!