Brooks Brothers Face Off In Front of Family

Thursday night’s contest at Black Hills Arena probably didn’t seem that special to most people: a nondescript inter-division matchup between the Dakota Jackalopes and New York Night, two sub-.500 teams without a meaningful rivalry.  But for Robert and Mary Brooks, this was a game that they have waited years to witness.  For the first time, the Brookses got to see their sons, Charlie and Tanner, play against each other at the professional level.

“We spent so many years praying for this day,” said Robert.  “At times, it felt like it would never get here.  But now it’s here, and we’re so blessed to be able to share it.”

There wasn’t much on-ice sibling rivalry for the Brooks boys when they were younger, as Charlie was seven years older than Tanner.  Apart from occasional neighborhood games of shinny, they never played against one another.  “Charlie was Tanner’s idol growing up,” explains Mary.  “Everything he did, Tanner wanted to do too.”

Charlie Brooks

When Charlie signed with the SHL in 2015, Tanner wanted to do the same as soon as he was able.  Charlie talked up his younger brother at every opportunity, and in 2017 at age 20, Tanner signed a minor-league deal with the Saskatchewan Shockers.  Tanner quickly impressed with his strong two-way play, but found himself blocked by a logjam at center.  His older brother frequently texted encouragement, sending pictures of SHL rinks and locker rooms with captions like, “can’t wait to see u here!”

Finally, last season, Tanner was dealt to Dakota, and got his shot at the SHL at last.  Naturally, their parents couldn’t wait to see the brothers face off, even though they were in different divisions (Charlie was with Washington at the time).  But the fates conspired against them.  Dakota and Washington faced each other just a couple days after the trade, but Charlie was sidelined with an injury.  (He took Tanner out to dinner instead.)  They played again in DC a couple weeks later (a 5-3 Jackalopes win), and both brothers played, but Mary was ill and couldn’t travel.

“We were heartbroken that we missed it,” Mary said.  “But [the brothers] reminded us that they’d play each other again a lot of times, and we just had to be patient.”

After Charlie was traded to New York in the offseason, the family began checking the schedule, and quickly circled this date.  As the game drew closer, the family texted back and forth, making sure that nothing would derail this get-together.  “I wanted to send a joke text making believe that I’d been suspended,” said Tanner, “but Charlie pointed out I’d probably give Mom a heart attack.”

Tanner Brooks

The day arrived, and Robert and Mary flew in from their home in the greater Toronto area to Rapid City.  Robert wore Charlie’s Night jersey, while Mary wore Tanner’s Jackalopes jersey.  They also brought a couple surprise guests : the boys’ sister Claire, who is between Charlie and Tanner in age, along with her boyfriend.

“We figured if we’re going to have a family reunion,” said Robert, “why not bring the whole family?”

The Jackalopes provided the Brookses with the use of a suite for the game.  “I could get used to this kind of living,” joked Robert.

As it happened, both Tanner and the Jackalopes got the better end of the matchup.  Tanner scored a goal (a second-period strike on a perfect pass from RW Arkady Golynin), while Charlie got only one shot and didn’t score.  Dakota, meanwhile, held off New York for the 4-3 win.

“Score one for little bro!” said Charlie graciously.  “I’ve always said he’s the most talented hockey player in the family, so it’s only fitting that he won this one.”

“I would never have made it to the pros without Charlie teaching me and cheering me on,” replied Tanner.  “He deserves all the credit for this.”

So does that mean he’ll let Charlie’s Night win the next one?  “Not a chance,” Tanner responded without hesitation.  “We may love each other, but we’re still competitors.  If he wants the W, he’ll have to fight me for it.”

Continue reading “Brooks Brothers Face Off In Front of Family”

Night, Pistols Resume Unpleasantries in OT Thriller

On Sunday, the Hamilton Pistols and New York Night faced off for the first time this season at Gunpowder Armory.  Even though the teams came into the game with very different records, with the Pistols undefeated and the Night winless, the game between the two bitter rivals was expected to be very closely contested.

Nick Foster

In case anyone thought that the mutual enmity between the clubs had cooled since last year, Night coach Nick Foster happily re-stoked the flames in his press conference the day before, stating: “We’ve had this one circled on our calendar since the schedule came out.  We’re excited to come to Tank Town and skate into that festering old dump and snatch a win from the Nutcracker and his boys.  My guys all got their tetanus shots and their cups, so they’re ready.  As long as we get out before the roof caves in, we’re good.”

Pistols star Steven Alexander shot back, “It’s too bad [the Night] can’t play as good as their coach runs his mouth.  Apparently Foster forgot who won the Vandy last year.”

The match lived up to its advance billing, as a sellout crowd got to see a fast-paced see-saw of a contest with action from beginning to end.  Regulation wasn’t enough to settle things, but in the end the Night backed up Foster’s boast, heading back to the Big Apple with a 7-6 win.

According to league sources, the Pistols sought permission from the SHL to delay their banner-raising ceremony until this game, but the league vetoed the idea.  So instead, when the Pistols took the ice for the pre-game skate, Alexander came out holding the Vandy over his head and took a lap while the PA system played “We Are the Champions.”  As Alexander skated past the New York bench, the visitors greeted him with upraised middle fingers.

Once the game began, it took the champs a mere 25 seconds to get on the board, as D Burt “Hacksaw” Hampton deflected a shot by RW Ben Summers into the lower right corner of the net.  The rest of the period, however, belonged to the Night.  Just over two minutes after Hampton’s goal, the visitors struck twice, as D Rocky Winkle and C Rod Remington scored just eight seconds apart to give the Night the lead.  When Hampton went to the sin bin for high-sticking late in the period, Remington banged home a slapper to make it 3-1.

In the locker room between periods, Pistols coach Keith Shields exhorted his team to get back into it.  “Coach Shields never curses,” said Alexander, “but you could tell he wanted to.  ‘All right, boys, let’s go stick it to those flipping buggers!’”

Hamilton drew back even early in the second.  About ninety seconds into the frame, LW Magnus Gunnarson finished an odd-man rush with a shot that went through the five-hole on Night netminder Sherman Carter.  Less than a minute later, LW Jamie Campbell got the equalizer on a shot from the bottom of the faceoff circle that snuck in above Carter’s catching glove.  The score remained even for much of the second, but Night LW Charlie Brooks jammed one in from the slot with just under seven minutes left to give New York a 4-3 edge, which they took to the dressing room.

Steven Alexander

Less than two minutes into the third, Campbell got his second goal of the night, finishing on a beautiful pass from RW Kenny Patterson that split the Night defenders.  Campbell waved his arms to the crowd, which responded with ecstatic approval.  That tie lasted barely over three minutes, before Brooks scored again on a tip-in for a 5-4 New York.  A few minutes later, Alexander scored on a laser-beam slapper that bounced off of Carter’s blocker and in.  The feisty winger by holding his stick like a rifle and firing “shots” at the New York bench, who responded with another middle-finger salute.  Alexander was later fined by the league for his actions.

The crowd was roaring for more; they got it with six minutes remaining, as C Calvin Frye redirected an Alexander slapper just under the crossbar to give the Pistols their first lead since the opening minutes.  If the Hamilton fans thought it was over, though, they had another think coming.  Two minutes after Frye’s go-ahead tally, rookie C Norris Fletcher jabbed home the tying goal for New York, prying it loose from under the pad of Pistols goalie Lasse Koskinen.  The Pistols argued vigorously that the play should have been whistled dead, but the referees denied their appeal.  As boos filled the arena, Fletcher smirked and cupped his hand to his ear.

Less than two minutes later, Fletcher cemented his status as Public Enemy#1 in Hamilton by felling Alexander with a high stick that opened a gash under the winger’s eye.  Alexander went down the tunnel to get stitches, and Shields argued that Fletcher should be ejected for attempting deliberate injury.  Instead, he got a double minor.  Angry fans poured beer on the rookie as he sat in the penalty box; Fletcher responded by blowing kisses.

In the wake of the penalty, Hampton challenged New York D Donald Duckworth to answer for Fletcher’s high stick, but Duckworth declined the invitation.  “Typical New York,” Alexander fumed after the game.  “Big talk and cheap shots, but they won’t back it up.”

The Pistols tried furiously to score the game-winner on the ensuing power play, but their shots kept missing the net.  The penalty continued into the overtime session, when a sewed-up Alexander returned to the ice to rapturous applause.  Even with their star on the ice, though, Hamilton couldn’t get the puck over the line.  Finally, about midway through the overtime session, LW Chase Winchester scored from a severe angle to give the Night the win.

The visitors celebrated by blasting Ace Frehley’s “New York Groove” in the locker room – “loud enough for [the Pistols] to hear,” said RW Rick “The Stick” Nelson.  In his postgame press conference, Foster sarcastically thanked the Pistols for their pre-game Vandy skate.  “That gave us all the inspiration we needed,” the coach said with a grin.  “No matter what else happens this season, we’ll always remember we got our first W here in Tank Town.  Love you guys!”

Continue reading “Night, Pistols Resume Unpleasantries in OT Thriller”

2019 SHL Week 12 Transactions

  • On Wednesday, the Washington Galaxy activated LW Charlie Brooks from the disabled list.  Brooks missed the last two and a half weeks with a lower-body injury.  Due to his absence, Brooks missed last Friday’s game against Dakota, which recently acquired his younger brother Tanner.  It would have been the first time the brothers faced each other in a professional game.  To make room for Brooks on the roster, Washington demoted F Roman Bandikoff to their CHL affiliate in Baltimore.  With the rebuilding Galaxy looking to provide playing time for their young players, the 36-year-old Bandikoff (5 assists and -3 rating in 24 games) was deemed expendable.
  • On Saturday, the Hamilton Pistols sent down D Russ Klemmer to their CHL affiliate in Oshawa, and promoted RW Michael Jennings from Oshawa.  The Pistols found themselves down a forward when RW Claude Lafayette suffered a lower-body injury on Thursday.  Although Lafayette is not expected to miss much time, but the injury left Hamilton without a spare forward and forced C Henry Constantine to play out of position on the wing.  Jennings was with the Pistols at the beginning of the season, but was sent down at the trade deadline.  He put up 4 points (2 goals, 2 assists) in 21 games for Hamilton.
  • Also on Saturday, the Kansas City Smoke demoted C Owen Griffin to their farm team in Omaha, and called up C Edz Zalmanis from Omaha.  This transaction reverses a move made just after the All-Star break.  In 13 games with the Smoke, the 22-year-old Griffin recorded one assist while putting up a -11 rating.  Zalmanis, meanwhile, lit up the minors, notching 16 points (4 goals, 12 assists) in 15 games.
  • Also on Saturday, the Galaxy demoted D Murphy “Mutt” Metheny to their affiliate in Baltimore, and promoted D Ambroz Melicar from Baltimore.  As Washington continues to offer more opportunities to their young players, the 23-year-old Melicar was an obvious candidate for a call-up.  He was one of the top-scoring defensemen in the CHL, with 42 points (11 goals, 31 assists) in 47 games.  The 29-year-old Metheny, the only SHL player to hail from Arkansas, appeared in only 9 games with DC, failing to record a point.

2019 SHL Week 9 Transactions

  • On the Saturday of the All-Star Break, the Boston Badgers traded LW Cary Estabrook to the Hamilton Pistols for F Norris “Beaver” Young.  Read more about the trade here.
  • Prior to the beginning of play this week, the Dakota Jackalopes demoted D Victor Addison to their CHL affiliate in Idaho and called up D Rodney Black from Idaho to replace him.  Addison was a lightly-used reserve in Dakota this season; he appeared in only 7 games, recording no points and a -4 rating.  Recently, he had been passed on the depth chart by Geoff Moultrie.  Black, meanwhile, was one of the CHL’s top blueliners, putting up 29 points (19 goals, 10 assists) in the first half and earning a berth in the All-Star Game.
  • Also prior to the start of play, the Kansas City Smoke demoted C Edz Zalmanis and RW Andrew “Lucky” Fortuno to their CHL affiliate in Omaha, while calling up C Owen Griffin and RW Adriaen van der Veen from Omaha.  Kansas City’s offense was lackluster in the first half; they averaged only 24.3 shots per game, second-worst in the league, and they are dead last in plus-minus at -30.  The 23-year-old Zalmanis, who signed a 5-year, $3.5 million free agent contract in the offseason, put up only 4 assists and a -9 rating in 23 games.  Fortuno did a bit better, with 7 points (4 goals, 3 assists) and a -6 plus-minus in 24 games.  The 21-year-old van der Veen was a CHL All-Star and one of leading scorers, with 39 points (16 goals, 23 assists).  Griffin, 22, was leading the CHL in plus-minus at +24; he notched 30 points (5 goals, 25 assists) in the first half.
  • On Wednesday, the Jackalopes placed Black on the 10-game disabled list.  Black got off to a strong start with Dakota after being called up, with a goal and an assist in 2 games, but he exited in the third period of Tuesday’s 3-0 loss to Kansas City with an upper-body injury that’s expected to keep him out for 2 to 3 weeks.  Since the Jackalopes had 8 defensemen on their roster already, they chose not to call anyone up at this time.
  • On Friday, the Badgers activated G Roger Orion from the disabled list, after he’d missed three and a half weeks with a lower-body injury.  With Orion activated, Boston returned Jonas Schemko to their minor-league affiliate in Hartford.  Schemko looked good in his brief stint with the Badgers, going 1-1-1 with a 2.27 GAA and a .924 save percentage.
  • On Saturday, the Washington Galaxy placed LW Charlie Brooks on the disabled list.  Brooks suffered a lower-body injury in Saturday’s 6-0 rout of Boston.  To replace Brooks on the roster, the Galaxy promoted LW Alan Youngman from their farm team in Baltimore.  Youngman is one of the CHL’s top scorers, notching 44 points (20 goals, 24 assists) so far on the season.