SHL Issues First Annual Awards

Starlight Hockey LeagueAt a banquet celebrating the league’s second season, SHL Commissioner Perry Mitchell formally announced the creation of a new series of awards recognizing the league’s top players and coaches.  “We see this as an opportunity to recognize the many great individual performances that make the league so much fun to watch,” said Commissioner Mitchell.  These awards will be voted on by the league’s players, coaches, and beat reporters.

The commissioner announced the inaugural group of award winners, which are as follows:

jefferson-mcneelyMost Valuable Player: RW Jefferson McNeely, Washington Galaxy

McNeely had a strong sophomore season for the Galaxy, scoring 39 goals and notching 70 points while leading his team to its second consecutive SHL Finals appearance.

“Jefferson’s got more fakeouts than a three-card monte dealer,” said Washington coach Rodney Reagle.  “I mean, he gets a headman and starts heading up the ice, then all of a sudden he makes a move and he sheds his defenders and he’s breaking free.  If he ever gets tired of hockey, he should try being a magician.  He’s got that sleight-of-hand thing down cold.”

Other finalists for the MVP honor included Michigan G Dirk “The Bear” Lundquist, Hershey C Justin Valentine, Anchorage RW Nicklas Ericsson, and New York C Brock Manning.


calvin-fryeRookie of the Year: 
C Calvin Frye, Hamilton Pistols

The SHL had a very impressive freshman crop this season, and the voting for the Rookie of the Year trophy was very close indeed.  But Frye made enough of an impression to receive the accolade.  The 22-year-old led all rookies with 59 points, a number that included 30 goals and 29 assists.  He made enough of a splash that the Pistols traded away star C Rod Remington to make room on the team’s top line.

“Calvin is just an exceptional young man,” said Pistols coach Keith Shields.  “He has enormous God-given talent, and there’s no doubt about that.  But he also has a tremendous work ethic.  He’s driven to make the absolute most out of the gifts that he’s been given.  And even though he’s one of the youngest guys on the team, there’s no question that the whole team looks up to him as a leader.  As a coach, he’s my dream come true.”

Other top vote-getters in the crowded field included Saskatchewan LW Troy Chamberlain, Quebec G Riki Tiktuunen, Michigan D Fritz Kronstein, and Seattle RW Vince Mango.


Ron WrightCoach of the Year: 
Ron Wright, Michigan Gray Wolves

The selection of Wright as Coach of the Year comes as little surprise after he led the Wolves to a 43-14-3 record and their first SHL title.  It’s a happy ending to the game of coaching musical chairs that led Wright to Michigan in the offseason.  After incumbent Wolves coach Martin Delorme led the team to a close second-place finish last season, he left to become the first coach of the Quebec Tigres, his hometown team.  Meanwhile, Wright had had a falling out with players and management in Hamilton, and was already contemplating resignation.  When the Michigan job opened up, Wright jumped at the chance.  Suffice to say, it’s been a win-win for both parties.

“Coach Wright is the big reason we won this year,” said Wolves C Hunter Bailes.  “He’s very smart strategically, and he’s also really dedicated to practice and the kind of lunch-pail work most players don’t want to do.  He’s told us again and again that championships aren’t won with highlight-reel plays; they’re won through strong fundamentals, wall work, controlling the puck.  Now we’ve seen that approach pay off firsthand.”

Other coaches receiving votes included Washington’s Reagle, Dakota’s Harold Engellund, and Hershey’s “Chocolate Chip” Barber.

brock manningSharp Shooter Award: C Brock Manning, New York Night

This award was not determined through voting; rather, it was awarded to the player who finished with the highest goal total.  This season, that was Manning.  He finished the year with 55 goals, 10 ahead of second-place Steven Alexander of Hamilton.

“This isn’t the trophy I really wanted to win,” admitted Manning.  “I mean, I’m glad to be recognized, and I’m definitely proud of the season that I had.  But this sport is all about championships, and we didn’t come close to that.  I’d totally trade this award for a shot at the Vandy.  Maybe we’ll get there next year.”


Chase WinchesterCommissioner’s Trophy: 
LW Chase Winchester, New York Night

Like the Sharp Shooter Award, the Commissioner’s Trophy isn’t awarded based on voting; instead, it’s given to the player who finishes with the highest season point total.  Winchester earned this year’s award with an incredible offensive season, shattering the SHL record with 104 points, six ahead of his teammate Manning.  Winchester’s point total was largely driven by assists; he recorded an incredible 88 this season, 25 more than his nearest competitor.

Despite having the league’s two best offensive producers in Manning and Winchester, along with other quality scorers including RW Rick “The Stick” Nelson and Ds Dominic Sanchez and Tuomas Nurmi, New York finished with a sub-.500 record thanks to so-so goaltending, abysmal defense, and volatile team chemistry.  Coach Preston Rivers was fired at the end of the season.

“I feel optimistic about where we’re headed,” said Winchester.  “We’ve got the best offense in the league, bar none.  If we can strengthen the blue line a little bit and smooth out some of the problems in the clubhouse, I think we can make some real noise next season.”


Dirk LundquistGoalie of the Year: 
Dirk Lundquist, Michigan Gray Wolves

This award came as no surprise.  In fact, Lundquist was the only unanimous award winner this season.  There wasn’t any serious room for debate, either; the Michigan netminder posted a 39-10-2 record with a 1.57 GAA and a .941 save percentage.  He led the league in wins, GAA, and save percentage by a comfortable margin.

“There’s no one better than The Bear,” said Wright.  “He’s got incredible reflexes and top-notch instincts.  But best of all, he just doesn’t get rattled out there.  Nothing fazes him.  Forget about ice water in his veins; he’s got solid ice in there.  He’s got that kind of calm under pressure.  He’d make a hell of a soldier; the heat of battle doesn’t get to him at all.  They should just name the award after him now and save time.”

raymond-smythDefenseman of the Year: Raymond Smyth, Hamilton Pistols

Despite finishing fourth in the East, the Pistols can take solace in capturing a pair of awards: the Rookie of the Year nod for Frye, and an award for their blue-chip defender, Smyth.  The 26-year-old Manitoba native was brilliant on both ends of the ice this season; he produced 49 assists, the highest total in the league among defensemen, and provided lock-down brilliance in his own end.  Smyth was anmong the league leaders in blocked shots, and played fierce defense while racking up only 51 total penalty minutes.

“There’s a reason why Raymond is our team captain,” said Shields.  “He’s a tremendous leader for us.  He always plays heads-up hockey, doesn’t take shifts off, plays through pain, and he plays at a really high level.  He doesn’t neglect any aspect of his game.  He just radiates strength in everything he does.”

Smyth got the nod over Hershey’s Reese Milton, New York’s Nurmi, Washington’s Bruce “Boom Boom” Hogaboom, and his Pistols teammate Dmitri Kalashnikov.

 

Galaxy Absorb A Tough Loss, Look to Next Year

Washington SmallYou can’t blame the Washington Galaxy if they’re feeling a sense of déjà vu.  They end the SHL’s second season in a very similar position to the way they ended the first.  Just like last season, the Galaxy won the Eastern division.  Just like last season, they headed into the Finals as a heavy underdog against a powerful Western champion.  Just like last season, they played a strong series and made things much closer than anyone expected.  But just like last season, they came up on the short end of a close series.

“I used to like the movie Groundhog Day, before I started living it,” said C Eddie Costello.

This year, a last-minute goal in Game 6 propelled the Michigan Gray Wolves to the championship and sent Washington packing.  Galaxy coach Rodney Reagle praised his team for their valiant fight, especially given the rough beginning to the series.

“A lot of teams would have rolled over and given up after those games,” said Reagle, referring to Games 1 and 2, which Washington lost by a combined 6-0 score.  “It would be easy to say, ‘Well, it’s not our year, they’re way better than us.’  But our guys didn’t do that.  They gave it their all, and it was nothing but one-goal games after that.  That was the most inspirational thing I’ve seen since the end of the Muppet Movie.”

But after a second straight narrow loss, the Galaxy find themselves facing key questions headed into the offseason.  Do their two division titles and competitive showings in the Finals indicate a team that is good enough as is, and should return intact?  Or do those two straight Finals losses indicate a team that needs to get better if they’re going to have a shot at beating out the Western heavyweights?

“I wouldn’t go crazy talking about changes,” said Reagle.  “I mean, you flip a coin twice and it comes up tails both times, do you go get a new coin, or do you keep flipping?  This is a strong team, and I wouldn’t expect us to blow anything up.”

Star RW Jefferson McNeely said that the experience of losing in the Finals will only make Washington better.  “When you lose like this, it stings,” said McNeely.  “But it’s the kind of pain that inspires you to work harder, so you won’t have to feel it again next time.  And playing against teams like Michigan and Anchorage, it gives you a real measuring stick about where you are as a team.  I think that will help us next season.”

But it’s not just the Western powers that the Galaxy have to worry about.  They barely beat the Hershey Bliss to win the East this season, and the Bliss are likely to look aggressively at upgrades for next year.  The New York Night fired coach Preston Rivers and are eagerly planning to be more competitive next season.  Even youth-oriented Hamilton and Quebec are likely to come back stronger next season.

“We can’t take it for granted that we’re going back to the Finals next year,” said Costello.  “It’ll be a dogfight even within the division.  But that should help make us stronger.”

Overall, it sounds like the Galaxy are largely content to let it ride for next season.  But Reagle raised an important caveat.  “Now, it’s not like [GM] Ace [Adams] is going to be hibernating until next season,” said the coach.  “And if he sees a way to make us better, he’s not going to be dumb enough to say no.  So could there be a change, even a big one?  Like Paul Harvey says, you’ll have to come back next year to get the rest of the story.”

Bailes Named Finals MVP

hunter-bailes
Hunter Bailes

The SHL selected Michigan Gray Wolves C Hunter Bailes as its 2016 SHL Finals MVP.  Bailes was the primary offensive engine for the Wolves all season, leading the team with 36 goals and 59 points.  He kept up that reputation in the Finals, leading all scorers with 5 goals.  In the deciding Game 6, Bailes scored a pair of goals, including the game-winner in the final minute.

“Hunter’s a hockey player’s hockey player,” said Wolves coach Ron Wright.  “He’s the kind of guy who’s not flashy or showy, but he knows how to get the job done.  He’s more at home on the ice than on the red carpet, and he lives for the game.  He’s a real professional and a true leader, and everyone on the team looks up to him.”

Bailes’ game-winner propelled him to the narrowest of MVP wins over goaltender Dirk “The Bear” Lundquist.  Lundquist opened the Finals with back-to-back shutouts, the first goalie in SHL history to do so, and finished the Finals with  a 1.49 GAA and a .946 save percentage.  “Honestly, I think they should have given it to Dirk,” said Bailes.  “He’s the backbone of everything we do.”

As part of the MVP honor, Bailes received a 25-foot Chirs Craft powerboat.  “This is cool!” exclaimed Bailes.  “I’m going to take this back home and cruise around Lake Simcoe all summer and land some stripers.”

Finals Interview: Dirk Lundquist

Michigan SmallWe caught up with Michigan Gray Wolves G Dirk “The Bear” Lundquist shortly after his team claimed the 2016 SHL championship.

SHL Digest: We’re here with Dirk “The Bear” Lundquist of the newly crowned SHL champion Gray Wolves.  Dirk, how does it feel to win the Vandy?

Dirk Lundquist
Dirk “The Bear” Lundquist

Dirk Lundquist: Whooooeeee!  Let me tell you, it feels really great.  The Vandy’s a shiny, shiny trophy, and getting to hold it, it’s like when I held my daughter for the first time.  So beautiful!

SHLD: If you had to pick one thing that propelled you to the championship, what was it?

DL: Our team spirit.  We’re a tough bunch of guys, no question.  The NHL passed us all over, and that gave us a little extra motivation to show what we can accomplish.  And we’re a blue-collar team.  We’re not in it for glory, we’re in it for hard work and getting the job done.

SHLD: In the first two games of this series, you posted back-to-back shutouts.  That’s the first time any SHL goalie has ever done that, and you did it in the Finals.  Does that show that you’re at your best when the stakes are highest?

DL: It shows that we all are, as a team.  I wouldn’t be nearly so successful as a goalie if I didn’t have a great defense in front of me.  They sacrifice their bodies to block shots, they throw themselves into the wall work, they work hard to deny the other team good looks at the net.  I wouldn’t be here without them.  This is a whole-team effort.

SHLD: We heard that your famous beard might undergo some changes now that you’ve won.  Care to comment?

DL: Well, my daughter Lindsey, she keeps telling me she wants to braid my beard.  So I told her that if we won the championship, I’d let her do it.  Now we’ve won, so I guess I’ve got to do it.  She’s 5, so I don’t know what kind of job she’s going to do.  It should be interesting!

SHLD: Good luck with that!  Now, you mentioned the NHL before, and getting passed over.  After the kind of job you’ve done the last couple seasons, I imagine some NHL teams might come calling.  Is that something you’d consider?

DL: Hell no!  I’m right where I belong.  The only place I want to be next year is back here in Michigan with my friends, defending our title.

SHLD: One last question: Now that you’ve won the title, what are you going to do next?

DL: Well, first I plan to drink all the beer I can find.  Then I’m going to sleep for about a month.

SHLD: Sounds good!  Well, congratulations, Dirk.  Go celebrate with your teammates!

DL: Thanks.  Wolves forever!

2016 SHL Finals – Game 6

Michigan SmallWashington SmallMICHIGAN GRAY WOLVES 3, WASHINGTON GALAXY 2

A lot of things had to happen for Ron Wright to become the coach of the Michigan Gray Wolves.  The Wolves had to come up short to Anchorage in the Western race.  The SHL had to decide to expand to Quebec, and incumbent Wolves coach Martin Delorme had to decide to leave and coach his hometown team.   Wright had to have a falling-out with Hamilton, the team he coached last season, and decide to leave.

Both Wright and the Wolves couldn’t be happier that everything worked out the way it did.  The fit between the gritty, hard-working, serious-minded team and the driven, fanatically prepared, and hard-nosed coach was perfect.  The Wolves thrived under Wright’s leadership, and they completed their mission today, defeating the Washington Galaxy 3-2 to win the SHL Finals and claim their first Vandy.

“No way do we get this far without Coach Wright,” said Wolves C Hunter Bailes.  “When we got off to a strong start, he was on us to make sure we didn’t slack off or take our foot off the gas.  And when Warren [Marlow] went down, he made sure we kept our heads up and didn’t let it get to us.  He was our guiding light all the way.”

Wright, meanwhile, gave credit to the players.  “It’s a privilege to coach these guys,” said the Michigan boss.  “As a coach, you can give them a map and show them the way, but they’re the ones who have to take the journey.  These guys have never hesitated; they’ve been willing to pay the price to be great.  They’ve worked hard, practiced hard, kept their noses to the grindstone.  This is the payoff.  The champagne tastes pretty sweet.”

The Wolves looked set to run away with the Finals after they captured the first two games by a combined score of 6-0.  But after the series shifted to Washington, the competition became much tighter.  The Galaxy took two of the three games at Constellation Center, and each game was decided by a single goal.  The Wolves suffered a major blow when Marlow, their second-line center, went down with an apparent concussion in Game 4.

As the series came back to Cadillac Place for Game 6, the Wolves were eager to close out the series.  “We weren’t panicking, for sure,” said D Frank Mudrick.  But we definitely didn’t want it to go seven.”

The first period was an action-packed one, as the teams combined for 23 shots.  Michigan struck fairly quickly, as Bailes beat Galaxy goalie Roger Orion with a backhand to the glove side less than five minutes into the game.

“That helped settle us,” said Bailes.  “Definitely better to play from ahead.”

But Washington didn’t fold.  They held the Wolves to that 1-0 lead for the rest of the period.  And a couple minutes into the second period, Washington got the equalizer on a slapshot by LW Casey Thurman.

Midway through the second, a much slower period offensively, Galaxy RW Jefferson McNeely was hit with a double minor for spearing the Wolves’ Jorma Seppa.  On the ensuing power play, RW Oskar Denison buried a shot from the top of the faceoff circle to give Michigan the lead again, and they carried that 2-1 edge into the dressing room at the end of the period.

During the break, Wright urged his team to turn it up a notch.  “A one-goal lead isn’t safe,” Wright told his men.  “Get the next one, and we can break their back.”

Unfortunately for Michigan, the team didn’t heed Wright’s admonition.  Less than two minutes into the third period, McNeely tied it up again by firing a low slapper past a screened Dirk Lundquist.  As the third period wore on, the Wolves’ repeated attempts to reclaim the lead went frustratingly awry: they pushed several shots just wide, and Denison fired a head-hunter that got past Orion but banged off the crossbar.

In the final minute, with both teams seeming content to play for overtime, Wright called timeout and admonished his team.  “You look dead on your feet out there!” the coach barked.  “There’s no ties in the playoffs.  Let’s go out there and win this right now!  They can’t hold out much longer.  Go out there and knock ’em out!”

Wright’s pep talk paid off.  The Wolves came out of the timeout with more energy, winning the faceoff and storming down into the Washington end.  Wolves D Fritz Kronstein fed a beautiful pass to a streaking Seppa, who fired a hard, low shot.  Orion made a tremendous sprawling save, but couldn’t corral the rebound.  The puck bounced out to Bailes, who elevated it just out of Orion’s reach and dented the twine with 27 seconds left.

“We knew it was over then,” said McNeely.  “We knew we weren’t coming back from that.”

After the final horn sounded, the victorious Wolves celebrated with boisterous elan.  A jubilant Lundquist hopped on top of his net and waved his stick to lead the crowd in cheers and chants, then clambered down and did a pair of cartwheels on the ice.  Bailes, Seppa, and RW Gordon Lunsford fired their helmets and gloves into the crowd, giving several fans priceless souvenirs of an unforgettable night.  Backup goalie Art Cowan raced onto the ice with as many bottles of bubbly as he could hold in his jersey, and the players sprayed each other and the fans.

A little later, SHL Commissioner Perry Mitchell emerged with the Vandy and handed it to Wolves owner Luke Faltura, saying, “If ever there was a team that balanced style and grace with blood and guts, it’s got to be the Michigan Gray Wolves.  Enjoy a trophy well-earned!”  There was a brief awkward pause, as the team sorted out who would have the honor of taking the trophy on its first ceremonial lap around the ice.

Finally, Bailes and Lundquist grabbed Wright, hoisted him on their shoulders, and handed him the Vandy.  As Wright circled the ice, supported by his players, he waved to the crowd and blinked back tears.

“That was a metaphor for our whole season,” said Wright.  “From the first day of practice to our ultimate moment of glory, we did it together.  That’s what makes this team so special.”

Continue reading “2016 SHL Finals – Game 6”

2016 SHL Finals – Game 5

Washington SmallMichigan SmallWASHINGTON GALAXY 3, MICHIGAN GRAY WOLVES 2

The Washington Galaxy aren’t going quietly.  Facing elimination in the SHL Finals, the Galaxy withstood an onslaught of shots from the Michigan Gray Wolves and struck in the final minute to steal a 3-2 win, living to fight another game.

“Not dead yet, boys!” crowed Washington coach Rodney Reagle after the game.  “Just like the Bee Gees, we’re stayin’ alive!”  The coach then proceeded to demonstrate his best disco moves.

The Wolves did their best to send the Galaxy packing.  They came out firing from the start of the game, and wound up outshooting Washington 33-22.  But Galaxy netminder Roger Orion stood tall amid the barrage, turning aside 31 shots and outdueling Michigan’s Dirk Lundquist.

“All series, we’ve been hearing about how, oh,Lundquist is so great, Lundquist is God,” said Washington RW Jefferson McNeely.  “But you know what?  Roger’s a damn good goalie too.  He doesn’t get the headlines Lundquist does, but he can be just as clutch.”

Michigan actually drew first blood in this game, with RW Oskar Denison drilling one home just inside the left pipe late in the first period.  “I was not expecting it to go in,” admitted Denison.  “I was hoping to have a big rebound that someone could put in.  I got lucky.”

Washington was able to get even early in the second.  After Wolves D Bjorn Tollefson was penalized for high-sticking, Galaxy RW Sindri Pentti cashed in on the power play, going five-hole on Lundquist.  Washington went into the locker room after two periods tied at 1, despite getting outshot 23-14.  “We were pretty anxious between periods there,” said McNeely.  “Yeah, it was tied, but [the Wolves] were really in the driver’s seat as far as puck control and zone time.  We knew we needed to slow them down and break their rhythm.”

The Galaxy succeeded in disrupting Michigan’s offensive flow, narrowing the shot gap to 10-8 in the third period.  A little more than five minutes into the third, Washington C Eddie Costello and LW Casey Thurman broke away on a two-on-one, with Thurman going top shelf to give the Galaxy their first lead of the game.  The lead was fairly short-lived, as Wolves C Hunter Bailes deflected a shot past Orion a little more than four minutes later.

The latter half of the third period was frustrating for both teams, as neither side was able to generate much offensive action.  “It kind of felt like we were both playing not to lose,” admitted Tollefson.

But with less than a minute left in the game, Thurman shoveled a sharp-angle shot past Lundquist, and the sellout crowd at Constellation Center exploded as Thurman did a celebratory belly-flop on the ice and his teammates banged their sticks against the boards.

“It was a tight game, and you knew the game-winner wouldn’t come easy,” said Thurman.  “But I think the fact that it was do-or-die, that gave us that little extra edge we needed to get over the top.”

The good news for the Wolves is that they still have a 3-2 series lead, and the action shifts back to Cadillac Place, where they drubbed Washington twice by a combined 6-0 margin.  But there’s also cause for Michigan to be anxious, as they’re missing a pair of key forwards, Vladimir Beruscko and Warren Marlow.  In this game, the Wolves were forced to give ice time to Kimmo Eliasson, a street free agent who signed an emergency contract with the team at the start of the Finals.

Wolves coach Ron Wright said it’s no time to panic.  “We’ve got to remember what got us here,” Wright told reporters.  “We’re not a team that relies on any one star to succeed.  We rise and fall as a team, and that’s how we’re going to win this.”

Continue reading “2016 SHL Finals – Game 5”

2016 SHL Finals – Game 4

Michigan SmallWashington SmallMICHIGAN GRAY WOLVES 3, WASHINGTON GALAXY 2 (OT)

Whatever else you might say Game 4 of the SHL Finals, it finished off with a bang.  The first three games of the series have followed a familiar pattern: two periods of tense, grinding, defense-first play, followed by a third period of wide-open firewagon hockey.  In Game 4, the high-flying action was compressed into the final 5 minutes, as a slow-paced game turned frenetic at the end.  It took more than the allotted 60 minutes, but ultimately the Michigan Gray Wolves, thanks to a little-used reserve, pulled out a 3-2 overtime victory over the Washington Galaxy.  Michigan moved within a single win of the Vandy, but it came at a steep cost, as the Wolves lost a key offensive playmaker in C Warren Marlow.

“We got the W, and that’s what counts the most,” said Michigan coach Ron Wright.  “But losing Warren… that’s a real blow.”

The Wolves notched their win thanks to a little-used reserve.  Under ordinary circumstances, F Isaac Preston wouldn’t be expected to play at all in the Finals.  He played in only 17 games this season, recording 3 assists and no goals.  But when LW Vladimir Beruschko suffered an injury in the last week of the season, Preston was thrust into a starting spot.

“My first priority was, don’t embarrass myself or the team,” said Preston.

The reserve forward made very little impact through the first three games.  But in this game, Preston came through when it counted.  About a minute into overtime, Michigan D Bjorn Tollefson faked a slapshot from the left faceoff circle.  He got Galaxy G Roger Orion to commit, then slid a pass over to Preston.  With a wide-open net, Preston buried the game-winning shot under the crossbar.

“I don’t think I’ve ever been that open, not even in practice,” said Preston.  “If I’d missed it, I’m pretty sure my teammates would have beaten me to death.

Preston’s winner capped a flurry in the final five minutes of frenzied action, which stood in stark contrast to most of the play up to that point.  Michigan struggled all game to enter the zone and get shots on net, much as Washington had done in the first two games.  Michigan got off only 20 shots in the entire game, including a season-low four in a brutal second period.  “It’s like they watched our game film from the first two and turned our own game plan against us,” said Wolves C Hunter Bailes.

The Galaxy, meanwhile, were able to generate more offense, but had a devil of a time getting pucks past Wolves goalie Dirk Lundquist.  “You can’t fake him out, you can’t sneak one under him, you can’t fool him, nothing,” said Galaxy LW Casey Thurman.  “I think he must be able to read minds or something.”

Late in the first period, Washington C Eddie Costello beat Lundquist on a breakaway to give the Galaxy the lead.  Early in the third, Bailes struck on the power play to tie it up.  But that was it for offense… at least until the final five minutes.

With three and a half minutes left in regulation, Galaxy LW Walt Camernitz accidentally caught Marlow under the eye with a high stick.  On the resulting power play, Wolves C Wesley Knight deflected a slapshot past Orion to put Michigan ahead 2-1.

“That’s on me,” said Camernitz.  “In that situation, late in a close game, I can’t take a penalty like that.  Got to maintain better control of my stick.”

A disconsolate silence fell over Constellation Center, as the Galaxy seemed doomed to a heartbreaking defeat.  But in the waning seconds of the game, Washington launched a final desperate rush.  A Thurman slapshot got lost in a scrum in front of the net.  The puck bounced between bodies as Lundquist tried to get a glove on it.  Finally, with four seconds left, the puck squirted behind Lundquist and over the goal line.  Wright challenged the goal, claiming that a Galaxy player had kicked it in.  After several minutes of review, the referees upheld the goal, as the crowd exploded with delight. Costello got credit for the tally.

Fortunately for the Wolves, they prevailed in overtime, although with a cost.  Marlow made the initial pass that led to Michigan’s winning goal, but he paid for it when Galaxy D Rusty Anderson laid a devastating hit on him and Marlow’s head hit the ice.  After the game, he entered the league’s concussion protocol.  Wright sounded doubtful that his second-line center would be able to return in the series.

“We’ll have to reevaluate him tomorrow and see where things stand,” said the coach.

The Galaxy suffered a loss as well, with D Leonard Wright being sidelined after taking a rough open-ice hit.  He suffered an upper-body injury, and Washington coach Rodney Reagle confirmed that he is likely to miss the rest of the series.

The Galaxy face an uphill battle, having to win the next three games in a row with half of their top defensive pairing on the shelf.  “I’ve already got Bartlett’s Book of Inspiring Sports Cliches by my bedside,” said Reagle.  “I’ll be working on my big speech tomorrow morning.”

Continue reading “2016 SHL Finals – Game 4”